13 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though its title refers to the epicenter of the early Sixties Greenwich Village folk scene, Bleecker & MacDougal is hardly a run-of-the-mill coffeehouse record. With his dark-hued, sonorous voice and advanced songwriting skills, Neil was something quite apart from the hordes of hootenanny-goers in the Village. “Blues On the Ceiling” and “The Other Side of This Life” expressed the harrowing inner life of a tormented soul beyond what Joan Baez, or even Bob Dylan, had shown up to that point. And while it may have been the acoustic rave-ups like “Bleecker & MacDougal” and “Gone Again” that made Neil the toast of his peers, it was the languid style he showcased on “Little Bit of Rain” and “The Water if Wide” that would become his trademark. Forerunners to Neil’s haunting masterpiece “The Dolphins,” these narcotic blues would inspire everyone from Neil contemporaries Tim Hardin and Tim Buckley, to later exponents of inner-space rock’n’roll like Spacemen 3 and the Verve.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though its title refers to the epicenter of the early Sixties Greenwich Village folk scene, Bleecker & MacDougal is hardly a run-of-the-mill coffeehouse record. With his dark-hued, sonorous voice and advanced songwriting skills, Neil was something quite apart from the hordes of hootenanny-goers in the Village. “Blues On the Ceiling” and “The Other Side of This Life” expressed the harrowing inner life of a tormented soul beyond what Joan Baez, or even Bob Dylan, had shown up to that point. And while it may have been the acoustic rave-ups like “Bleecker & MacDougal” and “Gone Again” that made Neil the toast of his peers, it was the languid style he showcased on “Little Bit of Rain” and “The Water if Wide” that would become his trademark. Forerunners to Neil’s haunting masterpiece “The Dolphins,” these narcotic blues would inspire everyone from Neil contemporaries Tim Hardin and Tim Buckley, to later exponents of inner-space rock’n’roll like Spacemen 3 and the Verve.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

Grimmbo ,

"I'd Love To Stick Around!"

.."This Old Town; But I'm Gone Again!"..Ahh; Good Old Fred Neil; back again on the corner of Bleeker and McDougal Streets! "Folk-Blues" to "Folk-Rock"; this was a "Transitonal Album" for the man who would become famous for "That Song From Midnight Cowboy!"; "Everybody's Talkin' At Me; I Can't Hear A Word The're Sayin!" This is funky stuff for 1965; but no "Hit Single" here; other artists would cover Fred Neil later on:( Paul Butterfield Band & Jefferson Airplane) Fred's influence can be heard in the singing & stylings of: Tom Rush, Hot Tuna, Taj Mahall and James Taylor! Fred was "gone too soon"; but "Bleeker & McDougal" is a warm place to revisit! My picks: Little Bit Of Rain; Gone Again; Candy Man & Other Side To This Life! "Everybody's Talkin"; give this a listen!...by Grimmbo.

ggsatman ,

Love this--as for The Dolphin.......

You'll find The Dolphin on The Many Sides of Fred Neil==also worth owning, here on iTunes!

1st Stage LENSMEN ,

"The Dolphins...?"

The title review is correct.. Where's; "The Dolphins!?!?" I have literally searched for hours looking for this song! (could not remember the artist name..) That INCREDIBLE piece is done by Fred Neil.. I believe he wrote it as well. Wish iTunes could get a hold of it!!

Disappointed...

More By Fred Neil

You May Also Like