10 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grand in scope and vivid in detail, Andrew Peterson’s Light for the Lost Boy's lyrics draw upon both personal and literary sources to capture moments of suffering, healing and grace. Peterson invites comparisons with such legends as Rich Mullins and Mark Heard in his ability to recast Biblical teachings in language rooted in heartland America. “Come Back Soon” and “Shine Your Light on Me” bring to mind Paul Simon with their closely-observed imagery and bittersweet folk/pop feel. Themes of childhood bring an intimacy to “The Voice of Jesus,” “Day to Day” and “You’ll Find Your Way” as Peterson avoids typical fatherhood clichés in favor of deeper spiritual truths. He shows his gift for narrative in “The Ballad of Jody Baxter,” a tale of sin and forgiveness inspired by Marjorie Rawlings’ novel The Yearling. Musically, Light for the Lost Boy is as expansive as its subject matter, with flashes of rock guitar (courtesy of Audio Adrenaline’s Tyler Burkem) adding heft to several tracks. “Don’t You Want to Thank Someone” is a triumphant nine-minute evocation of God’s majesty.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Grand in scope and vivid in detail, Andrew Peterson’s Light for the Lost Boy's lyrics draw upon both personal and literary sources to capture moments of suffering, healing and grace. Peterson invites comparisons with such legends as Rich Mullins and Mark Heard in his ability to recast Biblical teachings in language rooted in heartland America. “Come Back Soon” and “Shine Your Light on Me” bring to mind Paul Simon with their closely-observed imagery and bittersweet folk/pop feel. Themes of childhood bring an intimacy to “The Voice of Jesus,” “Day to Day” and “You’ll Find Your Way” as Peterson avoids typical fatherhood clichés in favor of deeper spiritual truths. He shows his gift for narrative in “The Ballad of Jody Baxter,” a tale of sin and forgiveness inspired by Marjorie Rawlings’ novel The Yearling. Musically, Light for the Lost Boy is as expansive as its subject matter, with flashes of rock guitar (courtesy of Audio Adrenaline’s Tyler Burkem) adding heft to several tracks. “Don’t You Want to Thank Someone” is a triumphant nine-minute evocation of God’s majesty.

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