14 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s hard to account for the runaway success of Molly Hatchet’s breakout 1979 single “Flirtin’ with Disaster,” as the band had already recorded several songs with similarly swift grooves and punchy riffs. Then again, maybe “Flirtin’ with Disaster” just had the perfect lyrical touch; lead singer and songwriter Danny Joe Brown had a way with the rock 'n' roll lexicon. “Boogie No More,” “Good Rockin’," and “Let the Good Times Roll” are just a few examples of how Molly Hatchet placed itself in the great tradition of wild rockers like Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis. The headbanging riffs behind “Good Rockin’” hint at the impending sounds of '80s heavy metal, but on the whole Flirtin’ with Disaster has more in common with the sneaky, understated grooves of J.J. Cale than it does the steamrolling riffs of Led Zeppelin or Lynyrd Skynyrd. While other hard rock groups tried to bludgeon fans into submission, Molly Hatchet was more interested in coaxing its listeners with wily grooves, as it does on “One Man’s Pleasure” and “Jukin’ City.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s hard to account for the runaway success of Molly Hatchet’s breakout 1979 single “Flirtin’ with Disaster,” as the band had already recorded several songs with similarly swift grooves and punchy riffs. Then again, maybe “Flirtin’ with Disaster” just had the perfect lyrical touch; lead singer and songwriter Danny Joe Brown had a way with the rock 'n' roll lexicon. “Boogie No More,” “Good Rockin’," and “Let the Good Times Roll” are just a few examples of how Molly Hatchet placed itself in the great tradition of wild rockers like Little Richard and Jerry Lee Lewis. The headbanging riffs behind “Good Rockin’” hint at the impending sounds of '80s heavy metal, but on the whole Flirtin’ with Disaster has more in common with the sneaky, understated grooves of J.J. Cale than it does the steamrolling riffs of Led Zeppelin or Lynyrd Skynyrd. While other hard rock groups tried to bludgeon fans into submission, Molly Hatchet was more interested in coaxing its listeners with wily grooves, as it does on “One Man’s Pleasure” and “Jukin’ City.”

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