33 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

18 years after their formation, Let the Dominoes Fall shows that Rancid’s expertise at communicating desperation and redemption remains its most precious natural resource. Rooted in punk and ska foundations, Rancid goes fast and furious on the Brett Gurewitz-produced Dominoes (only three songs break the three-minute mark). There are classic Rancid touchstones: hooligan chants, skavoovie goodness, swirling pit agitators, and huge guitars and vocal interplay between Tim Armstrong and Lars Frederiksen. “East Bay Night” is a love letter to their Albany/Berkeley, CA home. They add some classic R&B in the mix with an appearance by Booker T. on Hammond organ for the Memphis-to-Jamaica rave-up “Up to No Good.” They take a Pete Seeger-like turn on the acoustic salute to a homecoming soldier, “Civilian Ways.” Let the Dominoes Fall shows Rancid’s depth and ambition as they approach their third decade together.

EDITORS’ NOTES

18 years after their formation, Let the Dominoes Fall shows that Rancid’s expertise at communicating desperation and redemption remains its most precious natural resource. Rooted in punk and ska foundations, Rancid goes fast and furious on the Brett Gurewitz-produced Dominoes (only three songs break the three-minute mark). There are classic Rancid touchstones: hooligan chants, skavoovie goodness, swirling pit agitators, and huge guitars and vocal interplay between Tim Armstrong and Lars Frederiksen. “East Bay Night” is a love letter to their Albany/Berkeley, CA home. They add some classic R&B in the mix with an appearance by Booker T. on Hammond organ for the Memphis-to-Jamaica rave-up “Up to No Good.” They take a Pete Seeger-like turn on the acoustic salute to a homecoming soldier, “Civilian Ways.” Let the Dominoes Fall shows Rancid’s depth and ambition as they approach their third decade together.

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