12 Songs, 26 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Southern California’s Epsilons were a snarling, unhinged Iggy-meets-the-Sonics garage-punk band, and Ty Segall was their spirited front man. After two records with that band, Segall stepped out on his own with a self-titled 2008 solo work, and whoda thunk that one guy could kick up so much dirt and noise on his own? Banging on a weathered guitar and foot stomping a kick drum with a tambourine affixed like a hi-hat, this one-man garage band packs more punch than most four- and five-piece groups. The influence of the inimitable Billy Childish fuels the convulsive “Standing At the Station” and the tinny, reverb-soaked “In Your Car” but tracks like “Lovely One” are completely Segall’s, this one surrounded by uneasy, open space and propelled by acoustic guitar and a solitary, twangy surf guitar line. Grinding, bluesy riffs drive tunes like “Cents” and “It #1,” while Segall’s vocals bob and weave on the darkly sexy “Die Tonight.” The hyper, feral “Can’t Talk” is like a double shot of espresso at 6 a.m. Like much of Segall’s music, it feels like something you shouldn’t indulge in too often ... but who’s noticing? Brutal and excellent.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Southern California’s Epsilons were a snarling, unhinged Iggy-meets-the-Sonics garage-punk band, and Ty Segall was their spirited front man. After two records with that band, Segall stepped out on his own with a self-titled 2008 solo work, and whoda thunk that one guy could kick up so much dirt and noise on his own? Banging on a weathered guitar and foot stomping a kick drum with a tambourine affixed like a hi-hat, this one-man garage band packs more punch than most four- and five-piece groups. The influence of the inimitable Billy Childish fuels the convulsive “Standing At the Station” and the tinny, reverb-soaked “In Your Car” but tracks like “Lovely One” are completely Segall’s, this one surrounded by uneasy, open space and propelled by acoustic guitar and a solitary, twangy surf guitar line. Grinding, bluesy riffs drive tunes like “Cents” and “It #1,” while Segall’s vocals bob and weave on the darkly sexy “Die Tonight.” The hyper, feral “Can’t Talk” is like a double shot of espresso at 6 a.m. Like much of Segall’s music, it feels like something you shouldn’t indulge in too often ... but who’s noticing? Brutal and excellent.

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