11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

When announcing his terminal cancer in September 2002, Warren Zevon cheekily hoped that he'd live to see the next James Bond flick. That wasn't all he packed into his last days, though. He added one more stellar album to his catalog. Life'll Kill Ya and My Ride's Here had intimated a close understanding of death-not to mention a gallows humor-that reached an all too real pitch on The Wind. "Disorder in the House" was an obvious metaphor, and the likes of "Dirty Life & Times" and "She's Too Good for Me" - the sort of rapscallion rhapsodies that always peopled his discs - took on an extra layer of meaning in context. Zevon's version of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" had an unavoidable chill that a hundred other covers didn't. And the closing "Keep Me in Your Heart," a lovely goodbye song, might have become a standard if it had made sense in anyone else's voice.

EDITORS’ NOTES

When announcing his terminal cancer in September 2002, Warren Zevon cheekily hoped that he'd live to see the next James Bond flick. That wasn't all he packed into his last days, though. He added one more stellar album to his catalog. Life'll Kill Ya and My Ride's Here had intimated a close understanding of death-not to mention a gallows humor-that reached an all too real pitch on The Wind. "Disorder in the House" was an obvious metaphor, and the likes of "Dirty Life & Times" and "She's Too Good for Me" - the sort of rapscallion rhapsodies that always peopled his discs - took on an extra layer of meaning in context. Zevon's version of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" had an unavoidable chill that a hundred other covers didn't. And the closing "Keep Me in Your Heart," a lovely goodbye song, might have become a standard if it had made sense in anyone else's voice.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
133 Ratings

133 Ratings

JtheBear ,

An amazing work

The irony of this album is that I purchased it and was giving it my first full listen the day I received a call telling me my brother was killed in a skiing accident... an album that is about loss, but also the joy of living your life to the fullest... it seems to alternate betwwen the themes of life and death... this is the one I sink into when I want to lovingly remember the lives of people who are no longer here.. or turn up loud when I need to be motivated to get out and live... an extraordinary final album from a great singer songwriter

Rich Two ,

He saved the best for last

This is arguably Zevon's greatest work. It's simply impossible to listen to this album without being painfully aware that the "I'm dying and I have something to say" filter is on, but Zevon strikes exactly the right tone here...sentimental without being maudlin, defiant but not angry. After a couple of good but clearly "produced-on-a-budget" recordings, Zevon and the gang pulled out the stops for one last, great CD. RIP, Warren. We miss ya.

EnigmaticHeirophant ,

One of many masterpeices

"The Wind" was an album that I really clung to as a favorite. I loved "Prison Grove" and "Keep Me in Your Heart" for their sentiment and laughed heartily at the lyrics of "Disorder in the House" and "Dirty Life and Times". Both songs were testament to the artist's sense of humor. As one of the greatest singer/songwriters that I have ever heard, I like to play Warren Zevon's "The Wind" whenever I relax.

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