10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a paragon of soft rock and singer/songwriter motifs, it’s no wonder Seals & Crofts got locked in the marketplace alongside other dually named duos such as Loggins & Messina, Simon & Garfunkel, and England Dan & John Ford Coley. Buoyed by the mellow “Diamond Girl” and the great, terminally melancholic “We May Never Pass This Way Again,” this 1973 album (their fifth) was their biggest seller. They rock it up on “Standing on a Mountain Top” and “It’s Gonna Come Down (On You),” get spiritual on “Intone My Servant,” dedicate themselves to the ones they married on “Ruby Jean and Billie Jean” and kick out a country-rock-bluegrass narrative on “Dust on My Saddle,” which could’ve been by New Riders of the Purple Sage. True moments of harmonizing beauty abound, especially on “Nine Houses” and “Jessica.” Besides the mandolins, keyboards, brass, and wind instrumentation, the album boasts a host of notable Los Angeles session cats (including saxophone-playing bassist Wilton Felder and drummer Jim Gordon) and was produced by the musically storied Louie Shelton.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a paragon of soft rock and singer/songwriter motifs, it’s no wonder Seals & Crofts got locked in the marketplace alongside other dually named duos such as Loggins & Messina, Simon & Garfunkel, and England Dan & John Ford Coley. Buoyed by the mellow “Diamond Girl” and the great, terminally melancholic “We May Never Pass This Way Again,” this 1973 album (their fifth) was their biggest seller. They rock it up on “Standing on a Mountain Top” and “It’s Gonna Come Down (On You),” get spiritual on “Intone My Servant,” dedicate themselves to the ones they married on “Ruby Jean and Billie Jean” and kick out a country-rock-bluegrass narrative on “Dust on My Saddle,” which could’ve been by New Riders of the Purple Sage. True moments of harmonizing beauty abound, especially on “Nine Houses” and “Jessica.” Besides the mandolins, keyboards, brass, and wind instrumentation, the album boasts a host of notable Los Angeles session cats (including saxophone-playing bassist Wilton Felder and drummer Jim Gordon) and was produced by the musically storied Louie Shelton.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

SyjPerilus ,

Great Memories & Great Jazz

I'm making my mom a CD of all her favorite songs growing up and She really loved this album. She loves the memories, the lyrics, the tunes,the jazz, everything about it!

thosro ,

DIAMOND GIRL

What a surprise to see this here! For years now, the only Seals & Crofts CD's in stores have been SUMMER BREEZE the GREATEST HITS collection, which repeats many of the tracks from SB. They were so popular in the 70's, but our collective cultural memory only retains up to a certain number of acts from any decade, and it seemed that Seals & Crofts were doomed to fall into the larger, forgotten group. This isn't as strong an album as SB, but it's darn good, and has some of their best individual songs. And driven by at least three big hits, I'm surprised it took this long to appear. Now- how about the rest of their catalogue?

Anonymous 57 ,

Required Listening

This album along with Summer Breeze should be required listening for anyone interested in the various musical themes of the 70's which represented a broad swath of musical tastes from rock and roll left over from the 60's to R&B, Motown, Disco (yipes) and softer folk artists like America, James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Eagles, and of course, Seals and Crofts who didn't enjoy quite the same commercial success but live on in the memories of everyone who lived through and especially went to high school in the 70's.

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