8 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the mid-'80s, it was hard to distinguish a Genesis record from a Phil Collins solo cut. Invisible Touch was released just a year after Collins' blockbuster No Jacket Required, and it plays like a sequel to that pop-rock classic. From the political "Land of Confusion" to the romantic ballad "In Too Deep" to the chart-topping pop of the title track, the album is packed with big hooks and glistening production—making for the most accessible and commercial distillation of Genesis' art-rock sound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the mid-'80s, it was hard to distinguish a Genesis record from a Phil Collins solo cut. Invisible Touch was released just a year after Collins' blockbuster No Jacket Required, and it plays like a sequel to that pop-rock classic. From the political "Land of Confusion" to the romantic ballad "In Too Deep" to the chart-topping pop of the title track, the album is packed with big hooks and glistening production—making for the most accessible and commercial distillation of Genesis' art-rock sound.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
51 Ratings

51 Ratings

Ibaneye ,

Tonight, Tonight, Tonight & Domino not the remasters

This is a great album, but like the other reviewer said, Tonight, Tonight, Tonight, and Domino are not remastered, in this iTunes release. I have the physical CD versions of the Genesis 2007 remasters; those songs are remasterd there. iTunes should correct this.

genesis48 ,

Most successful Genesis album ever!

And yet, some of these songs can be mistaken to be one of Phil Collins' solo stuff. But don't be fooled; Tony Banks and Mike Rutherford had big hands in on this album.

The title track is snappy, and was Genesis' only US #1 single. "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight" is a terrific anti-drug song that talks about a drug dealer. "Land Of Confusion": to anyone who listens to Disturbed, this is the original version of the song, and it is so much better. "In Too Deep", a lovley romantic ballad that still gets radio play to this day. "Anything She Does" is often a missed track, but it's a great listen, too.

"Domino" takes Genesis back to it's roots; long, story oriented songs. "Throwing It All Away" is another love tune, shorter than "In Too Deep", but just as nice. "The Brazilian" closes out this album as a quirky instrumental. Buy this album as a whole, and you'll discover that this is one of the best albums of the 80s, and was Genesis' finest hour!

Phreakout ,

Patrick Mateman

Do you like Phil Collins? I've been a big Genesis fan ever since the release of their 1980 album, Duke. Before that, I really didn't understand any of their work. Too artsy, too intellectual. It was on Duke where Phil Collins' presence became more apparent. I think Invisible Touch was the group's undisputed masterpiece. It's an epic meditation on intangibility. At the same time, it deepens and enriches the meaning of the preceding three albums. Listen to the brilliant ensemble playing of Banks, Collins and Rutherford. You can practically hear every nuance of every instrument. In terms of lyrical craftsmanship, the sheer songwriting, this album hits a new peak of professionalism. Take the lyrics to Land of Confusion. In this song, Phil Collins addresses the problems of abusive political authority. In Too Deep is the most moving pop song of the 1980s, about monogamy and commitment. The song is extremely uplifting. Their lyrics are as positive and affirmative as anything I've heard in rock. Phil Collins' solo career seems to be more commercial and therefore more satisfying, in a narrower way. Especially songs like In the Air Tonight and Against All Odds. But I also think Phil Collins works best within the confines of the group, than as a solo artist, and I stress the word artist. This is Sussudio, a great, great song, a personal favorite.

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