25 Songs, 1 Hour 21 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Pixies and their fans are best off pretending this isn’t a big comeback for one of the most influential alt-rock bands of the late '80s but rather an exciting new group fronted by former Pixie leader Frank Black. Original bassist Kim Deal dropped out of the running, with session bassist Ding now handling her duties. So this technically isn’t the classic Pixies. But as far as Frank Black albums go, this is a strong entry. These songs first appeared in a series of EPs, a gentle way of coaxing listeners back to the fold that also let the group make last-minute tinkerings to their work. The songs themselves feel much more accessible. Black appears to understand where The Pixies' sound turned the commercial corner. He still snarls and screams with the best of them, and the guitars are turned mean and nasty by longtime Pixies producer Gil Norton. “What Goes Boom” is an immediate battle between Black and lead guitarist Joey Santiago. “Greens and Blues” is more accommodating. “Bagboy” nods toward The Fall, an alternative band even more influential than The Pixies who’ve been shuffling lineups—and confounding expectations—for decades. The deluxe edition adds 13 live tracks from The Pixies' 2014 U.S. tour. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Pixies and their fans are best off pretending this isn’t a big comeback for one of the most influential alt-rock bands of the late '80s but rather an exciting new group fronted by former Pixie leader Frank Black. Original bassist Kim Deal dropped out of the running, with session bassist Ding now handling her duties. So this technically isn’t the classic Pixies. But as far as Frank Black albums go, this is a strong entry. These songs first appeared in a series of EPs, a gentle way of coaxing listeners back to the fold that also let the group make last-minute tinkerings to their work. The songs themselves feel much more accessible. Black appears to understand where The Pixies' sound turned the commercial corner. He still snarls and screams with the best of them, and the guitars are turned mean and nasty by longtime Pixies producer Gil Norton. “What Goes Boom” is an immediate battle between Black and lead guitarist Joey Santiago. “Greens and Blues” is more accommodating. “Bagboy” nods toward The Fall, an alternative band even more influential than The Pixies who’ve been shuffling lineups—and confounding expectations—for decades. The deluxe edition adds 13 live tracks from The Pixies' 2014 U.S. tour. 

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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
124 Ratings

124 Ratings

elosoguapo ,

No Kim required!

Great new songs by one of the great bands. Its been too long since we've heard a new pixie album and this one doesn't disappoint. Some complain about the lack of Kim Deal, but the new songs are awesome so deal with that!

Snoutston Hornbark ,

love it!

to the complainers… everything’s going to be okay

johnnyribcage ,

It’s definitely Pixies, and definitely good!

Is it the best Pixies? Nope. But it’s still great and still warrants 5 stars to me. This definitely bridges the gap from Trompe to modern times. There is a little bit of everything here - very adventurous music on this one. Just give it a chance and don’t be some hipster thumbing your nose at it. You probably weren’t even around in during the Pixies prime, so just get over it.

The only drawback is, although the production is lavish and rich, it suffers from a HUGE amount of compression and limiting, certainly applied post production, but probably liberally applied during recording as well. That’s the times we live in though.

Anyway, get it, it’s great, give it a chance. I can’t wait for the next one!

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