12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Those who've followed singer/songwriter Greg Trooper over the decades know him for his sturdy Everyman vocals and uncommon skill at rendering poignant character sketches. These abilities are very much evident on Incident on Willow Street, the New Jersey–born artist’s 12th album. This song collection benefits from the production input of Stewart Leman (who first worked with Trooper on his standout 1992 release Everywhere), as well as from contributions by such notables as multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell (of Bob Dylan and Levon Helm fame), keyboardist Oli Rockberger, and singer Lucy Wainwright Roche. The album’s sound and content reflects Trooper’s years on the road, as well as his experiences crafting tunes in Nashville. Echoes of Steve Earle and Richard Thompson can be heard in ruggedly bittersweet numbers like “Mary of the Scots in Queens,” “All the Way to Amsterdam," and “One Honest Man.” “Amelia” and “Diamond Heart” have a pronounced country twang, while “The Land of No Forgiveness” invokes the heyday of Greenwich Village folk and “Living with You” crackles with garage-rock energy.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Those who've followed singer/songwriter Greg Trooper over the decades know him for his sturdy Everyman vocals and uncommon skill at rendering poignant character sketches. These abilities are very much evident on Incident on Willow Street, the New Jersey–born artist’s 12th album. This song collection benefits from the production input of Stewart Leman (who first worked with Trooper on his standout 1992 release Everywhere), as well as from contributions by such notables as multi-instrumentalist Larry Campbell (of Bob Dylan and Levon Helm fame), keyboardist Oli Rockberger, and singer Lucy Wainwright Roche. The album’s sound and content reflects Trooper’s years on the road, as well as his experiences crafting tunes in Nashville. Echoes of Steve Earle and Richard Thompson can be heard in ruggedly bittersweet numbers like “Mary of the Scots in Queens,” “All the Way to Amsterdam," and “One Honest Man.” “Amelia” and “Diamond Heart” have a pronounced country twang, while “The Land of No Forgiveness” invokes the heyday of Greenwich Village folk and “Living with You” crackles with garage-rock energy.

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