18 Songs, 1 Hour 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since their debut in 2002, Kutless have set the standard for worshipful Christian hard rock, much as Petra did a generation earlier. Glory upholds the band’s tradition of ascending melodies building to triumphant choruses, carried by Jon Micah Sumrall’s lead vocals and the twin guitars of James Mead and Nick Departee. The album’s message is as succinctly powerful as its one-word title—these songs fuse sonic aggression with a believer’s humility to praise the Savior. The boisterous gang vocals and rolling tempo of the opening tune, “Revelation,” set the heroic tone for the tracks that follow. Songs like “You Alone” and “Rest” match expansive dynamics with crunchy riffage while delivering Scripture-based lyric content. “We Lift You Up” occupies a particularly central place on Glory, with its muscular edge and vertical lyrics. More subdued numbers like “In Jesus' Name” and “Restore Me” let Sumrall offer prayerful testimony that brings some needed intimacy to the album. The folk-slanted “In the City” captures a church-coffeehouse vibe with an atmospheric blend of acoustic and electric guitars and tribal drumbeats.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Since their debut in 2002, Kutless have set the standard for worshipful Christian hard rock, much as Petra did a generation earlier. Glory upholds the band’s tradition of ascending melodies building to triumphant choruses, carried by Jon Micah Sumrall’s lead vocals and the twin guitars of James Mead and Nick Departee. The album’s message is as succinctly powerful as its one-word title—these songs fuse sonic aggression with a believer’s humility to praise the Savior. The boisterous gang vocals and rolling tempo of the opening tune, “Revelation,” set the heroic tone for the tracks that follow. Songs like “You Alone” and “Rest” match expansive dynamics with crunchy riffage while delivering Scripture-based lyric content. “We Lift You Up” occupies a particularly central place on Glory, with its muscular edge and vertical lyrics. More subdued numbers like “In Jesus' Name” and “Restore Me” let Sumrall offer prayerful testimony that brings some needed intimacy to the album. The folk-slanted “In the City” captures a church-coffeehouse vibe with an atmospheric blend of acoustic and electric guitars and tribal drumbeats.

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