11 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded over four days by two award-winning Canadian guitarists, In Good We Trust is neither flashy nor modest. Manx and Breit can play a multitude of stringed instruments — from National Steel to mandolin to a cigar box — with equal virtuosity, and the duo drive each other to perform at the excited edge of their abilities. But there are no undue fireworks, no unbecoming bursts of showing off here. Right from the onset of this duo’s second album together — their follow-up to 2003’s Jubilee — they’re at their interpretive best, rendering Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” with a muted solemn menace before tackling their own noteworthy compositions (“Bottom of the Hill,” “Hang On”). Manx sings in the voice of a roadworn bluesman, croaking in the tradition of Greg Brown or the later days of former Kingston Trio singer John Stewart, the traditional “Death Have Mercy” fitting their form effortlessly.  Three instrumentals provide an extra outlet for these stringed-junkies to get their kicks, with the album’s closer “Sisters” providing a warm, subdued finale.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded over four days by two award-winning Canadian guitarists, In Good We Trust is neither flashy nor modest. Manx and Breit can play a multitude of stringed instruments — from National Steel to mandolin to a cigar box — with equal virtuosity, and the duo drive each other to perform at the excited edge of their abilities. But there are no undue fireworks, no unbecoming bursts of showing off here. Right from the onset of this duo’s second album together — their follow-up to 2003’s Jubilee — they’re at their interpretive best, rendering Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” with a muted solemn menace before tackling their own noteworthy compositions (“Bottom of the Hill,” “Hang On”). Manx sings in the voice of a roadworn bluesman, croaking in the tradition of Greg Brown or the later days of former Kingston Trio singer John Stewart, the traditional “Death Have Mercy” fitting their form effortlessly.  Three instrumentals provide an extra outlet for these stringed-junkies to get their kicks, with the album’s closer “Sisters” providing a warm, subdued finale.

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