32 Songs, 1 Hour 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Cribs display a greater discipline and focus on Ignore the Ignorant, tempering their rough-hewn attack with strategic refinements. The obvious new element here is the presence of guitarist Johnny Marr, whose primal riffage for the Smiths continues to be a key influence on modern rock. Marr’s gritty yet cogent playing fits the Cribs’ serrated melodies quite comfortably, lending pop-laced tunes like “Hari Kari” and the album’s title number extra heft. As before, lead singer Ryan Jarman defines the band’s attitude with his aggrieved, slightly cheeky swagger and his vinegary vocal delivery gives the chronic discontent of “We Were Aborted,” “Cheat On Me” and “Victim of Mass Production” a streetwise authority. “Emasculate Me” and “Nothing” pick up the generally morose tempo of the album with bursts of early punk effervescence. Jarman releases his inner Iggy Pop on lounge-tinged tracks like “We Share the Same Skies” and “Stick to Yr Guns.” With Marr on board, the Cribs display a greater maturity while retaining the guttersnipe edge that made their earlier records so much fun.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Cribs display a greater discipline and focus on Ignore the Ignorant, tempering their rough-hewn attack with strategic refinements. The obvious new element here is the presence of guitarist Johnny Marr, whose primal riffage for the Smiths continues to be a key influence on modern rock. Marr’s gritty yet cogent playing fits the Cribs’ serrated melodies quite comfortably, lending pop-laced tunes like “Hari Kari” and the album’s title number extra heft. As before, lead singer Ryan Jarman defines the band’s attitude with his aggrieved, slightly cheeky swagger and his vinegary vocal delivery gives the chronic discontent of “We Were Aborted,” “Cheat On Me” and “Victim of Mass Production” a streetwise authority. “Emasculate Me” and “Nothing” pick up the generally morose tempo of the album with bursts of early punk effervescence. Jarman releases his inner Iggy Pop on lounge-tinged tracks like “We Share the Same Skies” and “Stick to Yr Guns.” With Marr on board, the Cribs display a greater maturity while retaining the guttersnipe edge that made their earlier records so much fun.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

xxx1xxx ,

Skip this "Deluxe" version

The studio album itself is superb (thus the 5 stars) - get that instead for $9.99!

The additional $5 for the live set is NOT worth it, as I'd say it's a poor performance on all accounts.

Off key vocals + many flubs + a poor mix = avoid.

Josuelongo ,

10 times better than AM's Humbug!!!!!

I've had it since last week. Just one listen and you're hooked. It's that good.

Johnny Yugoslavia ,

Jarman Brothers at their finest (With Johnny Marr!)

I run the risk of repeating alot of the things that have been said about this album, but it is by far the best album I've purchased in a while. It's been almost a year since I bought it and I still listen to it at least a few times a week. The arrangements are amazing and the songwriting is superb. The addition of Johnny Marr has guided this band's sound in a direction that I don't think anyone could have foreseen. If you're a fan of the smiths or The Cribs, you'll love the direction they have taken with Ignore the Ignorant. Overall, the album seems to be a bit more dynamic than their former albums (not to say that their former albums were any less brilliant, just different). Johnny Marr really seems to have been a moderating influence that has given them, for lack of better term, a much more mature sound. The Live cuts at the end of the album aren't the best mixes, but for the completest, there are treasures to be found. It's pretty cool to hear Johnny performing with them early on (you can still hear him getting used to the song structure in some of these performances). In short, if you just want the record, you may not want to spend the extra money, but I certainly don't miss the extra 5 dollars. I quite enjoy the live bits.

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