14 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It would take a group called $uicideBoy$ to pen a love letter to their hometown and call it I Want to Die in New Orleans. The duo—cousins Suicide Christ and Ruby da Cherry—maintain that their music is an outlet for their darker, depression-driven impulses, but their appreciation for The Big Easy (along with scuzzy pop-punk vocals and mid-’90s, lo-fi Memphis rap) shines through on the first major release since their Kill Yourself series of EPs in late 2017. NOLA references are less Easter eggs than ornaments: The bass-heavy “Krewe du Vieux” honors the Mardi Gras parade of the same name, while “Carrollton,” which features an intro from Three 6 Mafia’s Juicy J, is named for an uptown neighborhood. The beat for “Coma” is built from a sample of Memphis legend Playa Fly’s “Kreepin Out Da Kut,” and the album’s interludes come in the form of local news clips about city-specific tragedies, like when the levees broke.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It would take a group called $uicideBoy$ to pen a love letter to their hometown and call it I Want to Die in New Orleans. The duo—cousins Suicide Christ and Ruby da Cherry—maintain that their music is an outlet for their darker, depression-driven impulses, but their appreciation for The Big Easy (along with scuzzy pop-punk vocals and mid-’90s, lo-fi Memphis rap) shines through on the first major release since their Kill Yourself series of EPs in late 2017. NOLA references are less Easter eggs than ornaments: The bass-heavy “Krewe du Vieux” honors the Mardi Gras parade of the same name, while “Carrollton,” which features an intro from Three 6 Mafia’s Juicy J, is named for an uptown neighborhood. The beat for “Coma” is built from a sample of Memphis legend Playa Fly’s “Kreepin Out Da Kut,” and the album’s interludes come in the form of local news clips about city-specific tragedies, like when the levees broke.

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