4 Songs, 18 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Emerging young song interpreter Logan Ledger started in bluegrass before cultivating his capacity for an entirely different kind of singing: He’s a sublime crooner in the Roy Orbison tradition, so it makes sense that he’d find an advocate in producer T Bone Burnett, who helmed a project that returned Orbison to prominence in the late 1980s and has found similarly indelible voices across several generations since. Burnett and several of his sophisticated studio standbys (guitarist Marc Ribot, drummer Jay Bellerose, bassist Dennis Crouch) back Ledger on this four-song EP. Ledger stokes the drama of the soaring ballad “Invisible Blue” and the surrealism of the title track, both originals. During “Oh, Sister,” a Bob Dylan cover, he summons courtly, romantic melancholy, his voice entwined with the harmonies of Courtney Marie Andrews and Russ Pahl’s swirling ribbons of steel guitar. The keening Appalachian melody of “Darkness, Darkness,” a Jesse Colin Young number, is the closest Ledger brings his gilt-edged voice to his bluegrass roots.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Emerging young song interpreter Logan Ledger started in bluegrass before cultivating his capacity for an entirely different kind of singing: He’s a sublime crooner in the Roy Orbison tradition, so it makes sense that he’d find an advocate in producer T Bone Burnett, who helmed a project that returned Orbison to prominence in the late 1980s and has found similarly indelible voices across several generations since. Burnett and several of his sophisticated studio standbys (guitarist Marc Ribot, drummer Jay Bellerose, bassist Dennis Crouch) back Ledger on this four-song EP. Ledger stokes the drama of the soaring ballad “Invisible Blue” and the surrealism of the title track, both originals. During “Oh, Sister,” a Bob Dylan cover, he summons courtly, romantic melancholy, his voice entwined with the harmonies of Courtney Marie Andrews and Russ Pahl’s swirling ribbons of steel guitar. The keening Appalachian melody of “Darkness, Darkness,” a Jesse Colin Young number, is the closest Ledger brings his gilt-edged voice to his bluegrass roots.

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