10 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1978, Alice Cooper famously checked into an alcohol-treatment center and then documented his experiences here. By the album’s end, you can’t tell if Cooper was exploiting himself in the name of alcohol or if alcohol was exploiting itself in the name of Alice Cooper. It works either way, because Cooper’s a master at drinking his own character into grisly scenarios, especially on “Inmates (We’re All Crazy).” The interior dialog between Cooper and Marcy Levy in “Millie and Billie” is as creepily comedic as anything on TV’s Dexter and Breaking Bad, while “Jackknife Johnny” features an early reference to a treatment center meth addict. “I Wish I Was Born in Beverly Hills” could’ve foreshadowed Lindsay Lohan’s tomfooleries, and “How You Gonna See Me Now” is a tender and unironic Top 20 ballad to Cooper's wife, Cheryl, about his fear of sobriety. Dark lullabies and power riffs pervade, and purposely overwrought arrangements suggest a Broadway musical adaptation. The album boasts mid-’70s stars, with drummer Jim Keltner (John Lennon, Bob Dylan), Davey Johnstone (Elton John), and lyricist Bernie Taupin among them.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1978, Alice Cooper famously checked into an alcohol-treatment center and then documented his experiences here. By the album’s end, you can’t tell if Cooper was exploiting himself in the name of alcohol or if alcohol was exploiting itself in the name of Alice Cooper. It works either way, because Cooper’s a master at drinking his own character into grisly scenarios, especially on “Inmates (We’re All Crazy).” The interior dialog between Cooper and Marcy Levy in “Millie and Billie” is as creepily comedic as anything on TV’s Dexter and Breaking Bad, while “Jackknife Johnny” features an early reference to a treatment center meth addict. “I Wish I Was Born in Beverly Hills” could’ve foreshadowed Lindsay Lohan’s tomfooleries, and “How You Gonna See Me Now” is a tender and unironic Top 20 ballad to Cooper's wife, Cheryl, about his fear of sobriety. Dark lullabies and power riffs pervade, and purposely overwrought arrangements suggest a Broadway musical adaptation. The album boasts mid-’70s stars, with drummer Jim Keltner (John Lennon, Bob Dylan), Davey Johnstone (Elton John), and lyricist Bernie Taupin among them.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
95 Ratings

95 Ratings

Pilatesnanni ,

Awesome! Wait!

I played the grooves off this album when it was released. I was another of the lucky ones who got a first issue with all of the doors and moving parts on the cover and the pictures on the sleeve. It is a hard to find collector now.

Even my mom loved "Wish I Were Born in Beverly Hills" for its cool rhythm and great hook, that is until she read the lyrics.

Some reviews claim this is lyrically gentler and lacking the shock value of other AC. In truth, it contains some of his most disturbing imagery and characters and I know I lost some sleep over it.

As stated by others, it was the collaboration with Taupin that brought the whole thing together so well and why it is a unique record for Alice's library.

Do not buy the partial release. It only works in its complete state. It is a journey.

Alice #1 Fan ,

Most Unique AC Recording Ever!!!

As a life long AC fan I found this album back in the mid 70's to be one of my favorites because it was not the norm for AC or anything being recorded back then. AC lyrics don't have to be harsh in nature to be able to understand his message. If anyone follows AC as I have would already know that drinking had taken control of his life. "From the Inside" was created from his expereance trying to break free of the demon that controlled his life Booze!!! This is a master piece for a studio recorded album. The sound was much more clear and crisp than music created by Kiss or other popular bands of that time. AC has music that can be listen to for what ever mood you are in. I wake up and my mood decides what album I play for that day. Try it. I payed this much for it when it was first released back in 1978.

Quasi-Reentrant ,

From the Inside


Alice Cooper does something really different and special in this album.

It is eclectic, emotional, and the songs are very well written and performed.

My particular favorite, "The Quiet Room", has wonderful dynamic range and fantastic synth with great lyrics. Although very different from the Cooper of the 70's we all saw on "Midnight Special" - this song seems to have caused the Artist to reach deep within and share something truly from the heart.

The other songs in this theme collection are all very good too.

I give it as many stars as possible.

Chris

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