14 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The third and final Mission of Burma re-release by Matador Records in 2008 is the band’s live album, The Horrible Truth ..., which was recorded during their farewell tour in 1983 and originally released in 1985. While many live records fail to deliver, this document stood as an exciting and fairly clean representation of the power of M.O.B. in a live setting. Now, re-mastered by original producer and Ace of Hearts label honcho Rick Harte, and re-released here in their original, correct sequence (other re-releases messed with the natural order of things), the songs are pure power, newly invigorated and carrying a palpable sting. “Peking Spring,” the song that started it all way back in 1979 as a tape-only college radio hit in Boston but was never properly released, is polished up here, and worth celebrating as one of their best songs.  Pere Ubu’s “Heart of Darkness,” an exhilarating ride in art-punk land, and the Stooges’ “1970,” which virtually explodes out of your earbuds, are almost worth the price alone. Kudos to Matador and Harte, for putting some spit and sparkle on what had been an enjoyable but flawed live album, documenting one of the most important bands of the indie-rock genre.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The third and final Mission of Burma re-release by Matador Records in 2008 is the band’s live album, The Horrible Truth ..., which was recorded during their farewell tour in 1983 and originally released in 1985. While many live records fail to deliver, this document stood as an exciting and fairly clean representation of the power of M.O.B. in a live setting. Now, re-mastered by original producer and Ace of Hearts label honcho Rick Harte, and re-released here in their original, correct sequence (other re-releases messed with the natural order of things), the songs are pure power, newly invigorated and carrying a palpable sting. “Peking Spring,” the song that started it all way back in 1979 as a tape-only college radio hit in Boston but was never properly released, is polished up here, and worth celebrating as one of their best songs.  Pere Ubu’s “Heart of Darkness,” an exhilarating ride in art-punk land, and the Stooges’ “1970,” which virtually explodes out of your earbuds, are almost worth the price alone. Kudos to Matador and Harte, for putting some spit and sparkle on what had been an enjoyable but flawed live album, documenting one of the most important bands of the indie-rock genre.

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