Editors’ Notes A little-known but nonetheless remarkable performer, Georgia guitarist and singer Joshua “Peg Leg” Howell recorded some of the most vibrant black music of the prewar era. A farmhand in his younger days, Howell was forced to make his living as an itinerant musician after losing his leg in a hunting accident at the age of 28. Around 1917 he left his provincial home in Putnam County, Ga., to seek paying gigs in Atlanta, and there he met his musical match and lifelong partner in the form of Eddie Anthony, a ragged but unfailingly inspired fiddler whose slurred cadences and dissonant tonalities immediately set him apart from the general run of string-band fiddlers. The duo honed their art on the Atlanta streets for nearly a decade before cutting their first session in 1926. Over the next four years they recorded a score of songs, which are compiled here. All are vibrant, pulse-pounding evocations of African-American life in Atlanta in the ‘20s and ‘30s.

SONG
Coal Man Blues
1
3:08
 
Tishamingo Blues
2
3:21
 
New Prison Blues
3
3:18
 
Fo' Day Blues
4
3:13
 
New Jelly Roll Blues
5
3:02
 
Beaver Slide Blues
6
3:25
 
Papa Stobb Blues
7
3:42
 
Sadie Lee Blues
8
3:10
 
Too Tight Blues
9
3:12
 
Moanin' and Groanin' Blues
10
3:36
 
Hobo Blues
11
3:20
 
Peg Leg Stomp
12
3:33
 
Doin' Wrong
13
3:04
 
Skin Game Blues
14
3:08
 
Georgia Crawl
15
3:25
 
Lonesome Blues
16
2:56
 
Please Ma'am
17
3:02
 
Rock and Gravel Blues
18
3:12
 
Low-Down Rounder Blues
19
2:53
 
Fairy Blues
20
2:58
 
Canned Heat Blues
21
2:56
 
Say I Do It
22
2:42