10 Songs, 33 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Five years after the platinum-level success of their debut collaboration, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson reconvened to release 1990’s Highwaymen 2. Returning to the producer’s chair, Chips Moman keeps the group’s vocals front and center while surrounding them with widescreen, reverb-tinged arrangements. The songs lean toward mythic themes, whether the lyric imagery invokes the grandeur of the West (“Silver Stallion”) or toasts modern-day outlaws (“Angels Love Bad Men”). “America Remains” especially captures the sort of brawny heroism that was the keynote of The Highwaymen’s first album. Tracks like “Born and Raised in Black and White” and “Anthem ‘84” are rooted in a bedrock morality and idealism, while “We’re All in Your Corner” radiates friendship and compassion. Nelson’s “Two Stories Wide” and Cash’s “Songs That Make a Difference” have the feel of personal credos, giving them a special resonance. Taken together, Johnny, Waylon, Willie, and Kris sound battle-scared yet defiant as they celebrate their status as survivors with a ragged yet life-affirming sort of optimism.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Five years after the platinum-level success of their debut collaboration, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson reconvened to release 1990’s Highwaymen 2. Returning to the producer’s chair, Chips Moman keeps the group’s vocals front and center while surrounding them with widescreen, reverb-tinged arrangements. The songs lean toward mythic themes, whether the lyric imagery invokes the grandeur of the West (“Silver Stallion”) or toasts modern-day outlaws (“Angels Love Bad Men”). “America Remains” especially captures the sort of brawny heroism that was the keynote of The Highwaymen’s first album. Tracks like “Born and Raised in Black and White” and “Anthem ‘84” are rooted in a bedrock morality and idealism, while “We’re All in Your Corner” radiates friendship and compassion. Nelson’s “Two Stories Wide” and Cash’s “Songs That Make a Difference” have the feel of personal credos, giving them a special resonance. Taken together, Johnny, Waylon, Willie, and Kris sound battle-scared yet defiant as they celebrate their status as survivors with a ragged yet life-affirming sort of optimism.

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