11 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Erlend Øye from Kings of Convenience initially wanted the Whitest Boy Alive to form as an electronic-based project, but on their second album Rules, the skewed vision solidifies even more as the quartet approximates dance music on standard rock band instruments, making for an outfit that sounds like a more festive Kings of Convenience and a grittier, earthier version of Parisian funksters Phoenix. If the distorted electric piano on “Keep a Secret” doesn’t get you moving, the four-on-the-floor disco rhythms are sure to charge your batteries. The short synthy breakdown on “Courage” is another moment of movement-inducing gold, but it’s the groove of “1517” that’s easily the most infectious moment here. “Island” is another solid standout with its dislocated keyboard intro that unveils mellow beats pulsing with the coolness of early ‘90s Madchester hits. Throughout the album Øye’s comforting tenor keeps things feeling relaxed and euphoric like a post-massage afterglow. Overall, Rules is slightly more mellow than the band’s 2006 debut Dreams.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Erlend Øye from Kings of Convenience initially wanted the Whitest Boy Alive to form as an electronic-based project, but on their second album Rules, the skewed vision solidifies even more as the quartet approximates dance music on standard rock band instruments, making for an outfit that sounds like a more festive Kings of Convenience and a grittier, earthier version of Parisian funksters Phoenix. If the distorted electric piano on “Keep a Secret” doesn’t get you moving, the four-on-the-floor disco rhythms are sure to charge your batteries. The short synthy breakdown on “Courage” is another moment of movement-inducing gold, but it’s the groove of “1517” that’s easily the most infectious moment here. “Island” is another solid standout with its dislocated keyboard intro that unveils mellow beats pulsing with the coolness of early ‘90s Madchester hits. Throughout the album Øye’s comforting tenor keeps things feeling relaxed and euphoric like a post-massage afterglow. Overall, Rules is slightly more mellow than the band’s 2006 debut Dreams.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
187 Ratings

187 Ratings

freudian33 ,

Here's what I'd like to say...

Begin my friends with 'Courage'- I dare you not to bob your head, to feel your body move with the beat. TWBA last album, Dreams is on my list of top ten albums in my possession of all time. Thus you can imagine my surprise when I see iTunes making Rules available for early purchase. I'm ecstatic to see TWBA back in action and with guns firing. The addition of synth effects only bolsters the already possessive sound that they have established as their own. TWBA is the topic of many conversations, they're an enigmatic bunch, still untoured in the US- so I believe. Rules is as chemical as Dreams. Buy it, buy it, buy it.

maxpush ,

Blown away by this album

simply amazing. FLAWLESS.

plaidjack ,

I miss the guitar work

Don't get me wrong. It's a solid offering. But there is no urgency. I'd get rid of that cheesy keyboard for some killer guitar. Save that crap for your other bands Oye

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