13 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A New Orleans icon, Ernie K. Doe was less a singer than a rowdy master of ceremonies. Though his raw-throated croak could never compare with the sweet tones of other New Orleans singers like Aaron Neville and Danny White, his wryly humorous delivery and irrepressible charisma made him one of the Crescent City’s most beloved musical figures, and his hard partying, no nonsense personae established a template for subsequent generations of New Orleans party starters. Though he remains best known for the classic “Mother-In-Law,” his self-titled 1970 effort here presented as Here Come The Girls! may be his best full-length effort. Ernie K. Doe is joined by Allen Toussaint and the Meters on a set of remarkable, largely Toussaint-penned tunes that compare favorably with other Toussaint classics of the era like “From a Whisper to a Scream.” Though the Meters are a bit more subdued here than on their rollicking instrumental albums of the same period, the slippery rhythms of Zigaboo Modeliste and the tricky, chicken-scratch guitar of Leo Nocentelli will be instantly recognizable to fans of New Orleans soul.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A New Orleans icon, Ernie K. Doe was less a singer than a rowdy master of ceremonies. Though his raw-throated croak could never compare with the sweet tones of other New Orleans singers like Aaron Neville and Danny White, his wryly humorous delivery and irrepressible charisma made him one of the Crescent City’s most beloved musical figures, and his hard partying, no nonsense personae established a template for subsequent generations of New Orleans party starters. Though he remains best known for the classic “Mother-In-Law,” his self-titled 1970 effort here presented as Here Come The Girls! may be his best full-length effort. Ernie K. Doe is joined by Allen Toussaint and the Meters on a set of remarkable, largely Toussaint-penned tunes that compare favorably with other Toussaint classics of the era like “From a Whisper to a Scream.” Though the Meters are a bit more subdued here than on their rollicking instrumental albums of the same period, the slippery rhythms of Zigaboo Modeliste and the tricky, chicken-scratch guitar of Leo Nocentelli will be instantly recognizable to fans of New Orleans soul.

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