11 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s hard to imagine Ida existing in the urban chaos of New York City, since their smooth, austere sound reflects a zen-like calm and a pastoral beauty that suggests not clanging subways and claustrophobic buildings but soothing streams and wide open spaces. Their 2005 album, Heart Like a River, was the band’s first album in four years and continues where the gorgeous The Braille Night left off, with songs that tint just a gentler shade of blue. Ida begin within the instrumental framework of folk-rock — acoustic guitars, sweet harmonies — and venture forth from there, turning in slow, ambient tunes that suggest what new age music might sound like with punk roots. “599” ups the wattage considerably — and gives their drummer a chance to finally hit with momentum — but mostly the group works on a simmer, never allowing things to reach the boiling point. “Late Blues,” “Mine,” “Sundown,” the songs release themselves to the air almost subliminally, quietly creeping into the subconscious.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s hard to imagine Ida existing in the urban chaos of New York City, since their smooth, austere sound reflects a zen-like calm and a pastoral beauty that suggests not clanging subways and claustrophobic buildings but soothing streams and wide open spaces. Their 2005 album, Heart Like a River, was the band’s first album in four years and continues where the gorgeous The Braille Night left off, with songs that tint just a gentler shade of blue. Ida begin within the instrumental framework of folk-rock — acoustic guitars, sweet harmonies — and venture forth from there, turning in slow, ambient tunes that suggest what new age music might sound like with punk roots. “599” ups the wattage considerably — and gives their drummer a chance to finally hit with momentum — but mostly the group works on a simmer, never allowing things to reach the boiling point. “Late Blues,” “Mine,” “Sundown,” the songs release themselves to the air almost subliminally, quietly creeping into the subconscious.

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