14 Songs, 40 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

What makes this one of George Jones’ finest post-’70s albums? For one thing, it contains perhaps the most heart-wrenching country ballad ever sung, “He Stopped Loving Her Today.” But it also finds the honky-tonk hero bringing more gravitas to the table than ever before. When he sings, “I’ve seen the dark side of life” on the alcoholic’s lament “I’ve Aged Twenty Years in Five,” for instance, he’s not gliding though some devil-may-care drinking song; he’s offering a gripping glimpse of a middle-aged man grappling with life-and-death decisions.

EDITORS’ NOTES

What makes this one of George Jones’ finest post-’70s albums? For one thing, it contains perhaps the most heart-wrenching country ballad ever sung, “He Stopped Loving Her Today.” But it also finds the honky-tonk hero bringing more gravitas to the table than ever before. When he sings, “I’ve seen the dark side of life” on the alcoholic’s lament “I’ve Aged Twenty Years in Five,” for instance, he’s not gliding though some devil-may-care drinking song; he’s offering a gripping glimpse of a middle-aged man grappling with life-and-death decisions.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

ShamanMan ,

Beware

Every song on this album will turn you into an alcoholic - enjoy!

David Ferrell ,

The Greatest Work Of Country's Greatest Artist

1980 saw the comeback recording of a man who had been known for some 25 years as THE sound of Country Music. After many personal struggles with drinking and drugs, and almost being booted from Epic (the record label he recorded for at the time), not to mention many "no shows" at concerts where he was booked (and when he did show, he had often been to boozed up to even remember the words to his own songs), but now with this recording, it seemed like George was back and all of a sudden, after a long absence from the charts, everything he recorded was going #1, starting with the beginning track to this album, the incredible "He Stopped Loving Her Today." Although, Billy Sherrill obviously overproduced the song (i.e. the soaring strings in the chorus), it was still a classic... maybe the saddest country tear jerker ever written, and Jones handled it wonderfully, milking every ounce of saddness from those heartbreaking lyrics and that resitation. One somehow felt that Jones was singing about himself in regards to Tammy, speaking of which, the follow up song, "If Drinking Don't Kill Me (Her Memory Will)" brought the same sense of a song about his own struggle to forget Tammy and drinking to try to do so. In fact, on live appearances, he would often end the song by singing "If drinking don't kill me, Tammy's memory will."
The rest of the ten original tracks of this album are also top notch, and now, a little bonus, Epic/Sony has added four more bonus tracks, probably intended to be on the album, but for one reason or another, in 1980 they didn't make the cut (remember this is a time when an album with more than 10 tracks was unheard of)... but they're there now, and Jones sings the heck out of them, just as he does with any other song he wraps his amazing vocal chords around.
If you don't have this album, get it. If you like Country music, I mean real country music, you'll love it!
It could very well be the greatest Country album of all time.

Remasculate podcast ,

One of George's Best

The album that brought George back into the stardom he belongs in. This album contains every sad note ever written. And George's voice delivers those notes with heart piercing accuracy.

If you don't cry why you listen to this album you've never been in love, been hurt by love or been so lonely you thought you'd die

George delivers the meds to help that broken heart. Listen and feel like a human again.

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