10 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their third studio long-player, the Glasgow post-rock quartet Errors move away from the Mogwai comparisons they garnered with their first two albums. Where their preceding recordings leaned hard on the experimental instrumentals, Have Some Faith in Magic introduces heavily affected vocal parts, expanding their sound into new sonic realms. The opening number, “Tusk,” also reveals a newfound love for elements of '80s based synth-pop. When the vocals surface in the following “Magna Encarta,” they sound sublimely distant and drowned in reverb, as if the band’s intention was to use them as another instrument rather than a focal point. “Blank Media” works in retro-toned analog keyboards, contrasting their playful tones with melancholic melodies to create something that sounds like the hip offspring of early Depeche Mode and New Order. But fans of the band’s sonic weirdness needn't worry. Even when they’re injecting songs like “Pleasure Palaces” with accessible dance club add-ons, their left-field leanings are still fully integrated (if not exaggerated).

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their third studio long-player, the Glasgow post-rock quartet Errors move away from the Mogwai comparisons they garnered with their first two albums. Where their preceding recordings leaned hard on the experimental instrumentals, Have Some Faith in Magic introduces heavily affected vocal parts, expanding their sound into new sonic realms. The opening number, “Tusk,” also reveals a newfound love for elements of '80s based synth-pop. When the vocals surface in the following “Magna Encarta,” they sound sublimely distant and drowned in reverb, as if the band’s intention was to use them as another instrument rather than a focal point. “Blank Media” works in retro-toned analog keyboards, contrasting their playful tones with melancholic melodies to create something that sounds like the hip offspring of early Depeche Mode and New Order. But fans of the band’s sonic weirdness needn't worry. Even when they’re injecting songs like “Pleasure Palaces” with accessible dance club add-ons, their left-field leanings are still fully integrated (if not exaggerated).

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