10 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Randy Newman’s first batch of new material since 1999’s excellent Bad Love, Harps and Angels follows many familiar Newman themes to their just placement. Produced by Mitchell Froom and Lenny Waronker, the album centers around Newman’s rolling New Orleans piano and orchestrations, and his droll wit and bluesy singing that often sounds surprised by what transpires. The title track traces a man’s spiritual reformation after being confronted with a near-death experience (he’s called to Judgment Day by a clerical error). “Losing You” explores an elderly couple’s inability to process the death of their son with their own lives’ nearing an end. “A Few Words in Defense of Our Country” ran as an Op-Ed piece at the New York Times and has worked as the album’s “advance single” recounting the missteps of the Bush administration. “Piece of the Pie” handles economic disparity. “Potholes” humorously recalls his father’s ability to forget everything but Newman’s own childhood failures. “Korean Parents” suggests that strict discipline and a hard-nosed work ethic is society’s desperate need. Newman’s that rare songwriter who never runs out of topics to cover.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Randy Newman’s first batch of new material since 1999’s excellent Bad Love, Harps and Angels follows many familiar Newman themes to their just placement. Produced by Mitchell Froom and Lenny Waronker, the album centers around Newman’s rolling New Orleans piano and orchestrations, and his droll wit and bluesy singing that often sounds surprised by what transpires. The title track traces a man’s spiritual reformation after being confronted with a near-death experience (he’s called to Judgment Day by a clerical error). “Losing You” explores an elderly couple’s inability to process the death of their son with their own lives’ nearing an end. “A Few Words in Defense of Our Country” ran as an Op-Ed piece at the New York Times and has worked as the album’s “advance single” recounting the missteps of the Bush administration. “Piece of the Pie” handles economic disparity. “Potholes” humorously recalls his father’s ability to forget everything but Newman’s own childhood failures. “Korean Parents” suggests that strict discipline and a hard-nosed work ethic is society’s desperate need. Newman’s that rare songwriter who never runs out of topics to cover.

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