12 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of Jason Boland & The Stragglers will notice a leaner and meaner sound to their seventh studio album. Credit this to Waylon Jennings’ son Shooter having co-produced 2013’s Dark & Dirty Mile. From the first few bars of the opening title track, it’s clear that The Stragglers’ brawny twang-rock is a perfect match for collaborating with an heir to the throne of outlaw country. While Dobro slide guitar and fiddle keep things traditional, a meaty rhythm section accompanies Boland’s throaty baritone with a late-'70s flavor. Roger Ray’s pedal steel helps the following “Electric Bill” sound so timeless that the tune plays like it was recorded at The Palomino Club while filming one of those Any Which Way movies that featured Clint Eastwood and his orangutan sidekick, Clyde. This is cleverly contrasted with topical lyrics that touch on government surveillance: “When they need to take a closer look at what it means to love/They can watch with a drone from miles above.” “Green Screen” similarly balances Red Dirt roots rock with lyrics lampooning 21st-century technology.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of Jason Boland & The Stragglers will notice a leaner and meaner sound to their seventh studio album. Credit this to Waylon Jennings’ son Shooter having co-produced 2013’s Dark & Dirty Mile. From the first few bars of the opening title track, it’s clear that The Stragglers’ brawny twang-rock is a perfect match for collaborating with an heir to the throne of outlaw country. While Dobro slide guitar and fiddle keep things traditional, a meaty rhythm section accompanies Boland’s throaty baritone with a late-'70s flavor. Roger Ray’s pedal steel helps the following “Electric Bill” sound so timeless that the tune plays like it was recorded at The Palomino Club while filming one of those Any Which Way movies that featured Clint Eastwood and his orangutan sidekick, Clyde. This is cleverly contrasted with topical lyrics that touch on government surveillance: “When they need to take a closer look at what it means to love/They can watch with a drone from miles above.” “Green Screen” similarly balances Red Dirt roots rock with lyrics lampooning 21st-century technology.

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