12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jake Shimabukuro does for the four-string ukulele what Tom Jones did for popular song. He redefines what his instrument can do and to whom it matters. Grand Ukulele—the follow-up to his 2011 World Music hit album, Peace Love Ukulele—was produced by Alan Parsons (Dark Side of the Moon), orchestrated by Kip Winger, and recorded live with no overdubs. What you hear is what Shimabukuro can do. The originals range from the surfy "Ukulele Five-O" to the mandolin wind of "Gentlemandolin," but the real jaw-droppers are the covers, since they illustrate how skillful Shimabukuro is with a concept. Adele and Paul Epworth's instant classic "Rolling in the Deep" retains its epic emotional sweep; just this time, it's on the heart-racing uke-runs. Harold Arlen's "Over the Rainbow," with orchestration, takes the Judy Garland chestnut into new territory, while Sting's "Fields of Gold" is given the easy-listening feel it's always demanded. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jake Shimabukuro does for the four-string ukulele what Tom Jones did for popular song. He redefines what his instrument can do and to whom it matters. Grand Ukulele—the follow-up to his 2011 World Music hit album, Peace Love Ukulele—was produced by Alan Parsons (Dark Side of the Moon), orchestrated by Kip Winger, and recorded live with no overdubs. What you hear is what Shimabukuro can do. The originals range from the surfy "Ukulele Five-O" to the mandolin wind of "Gentlemandolin," but the real jaw-droppers are the covers, since they illustrate how skillful Shimabukuro is with a concept. Adele and Paul Epworth's instant classic "Rolling in the Deep" retains its epic emotional sweep; just this time, it's on the heart-racing uke-runs. Harold Arlen's "Over the Rainbow," with orchestration, takes the Judy Garland chestnut into new territory, while Sting's "Fields of Gold" is given the easy-listening feel it's always demanded. 

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