14 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

“They say anger is a gift … I’m very gifted,” says Sage Francis in “Pressure Cooker,” the pummeling lead track on his seventh album, Copper Gone. Indeed, the veteran rapper still seems fueled by the seething emotions that won him renown on the slam-poetry circuit in the ‘90s. With admirable honesty, Francis parses a failed relationship with a maturity not present in his earliest recordings. While his customary snarl is still in evidence, he backs up his attitude with greater self-knowledge. Such production notables as Alias, Reanimator, and Buck 65 match his words with potent beats, swirling synths, and prodding guitars. Using both a meat axe and a surgeon’s scalpel, Francis dissects his curdled love life with delicacy (“Grace”) and raw force (“The Place She Feared Most”). Going wider, he blurs the sacred and profane (“Dead Man’s Float”) defies the uncomprehending masses (“ID Thieves”), and plumbs the depths of his own reclusive loneliness (“Make Em Purr”). From the tense simmer of “Vonnegut Busy” to the punchy groove of “Cheat Code,” Francis turns Copper Gone into a survivor’s testimony that extracts wisdom from rage.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

“They say anger is a gift … I’m very gifted,” says Sage Francis in “Pressure Cooker,” the pummeling lead track on his seventh album, Copper Gone. Indeed, the veteran rapper still seems fueled by the seething emotions that won him renown on the slam-poetry circuit in the ‘90s. With admirable honesty, Francis parses a failed relationship with a maturity not present in his earliest recordings. While his customary snarl is still in evidence, he backs up his attitude with greater self-knowledge. Such production notables as Alias, Reanimator, and Buck 65 match his words with potent beats, swirling synths, and prodding guitars. Using both a meat axe and a surgeon’s scalpel, Francis dissects his curdled love life with delicacy (“Grace”) and raw force (“The Place She Feared Most”). Going wider, he blurs the sacred and profane (“Dead Man’s Float”) defies the uncomprehending masses (“ID Thieves”), and plumbs the depths of his own reclusive loneliness (“Make Em Purr”). From the tense simmer of “Vonnegut Busy” to the punchy groove of “Cheat Code,” Francis turns Copper Gone into a survivor’s testimony that extracts wisdom from rage.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
70 Ratings

70 Ratings

Nwatson111 ,

It's safe to say, Sage Francis is a legend

What can I say? This album is everything that I personally wanted from Sage for this particular undertaking. His last album, Li(f)e, was unique in its production and scope. Although, admittedly it took me a few listens to fully appreciate it. I didn't really expect Sage to go down that route with Li(f)e- indie band backdrop, live instrumentation, etc. I was looking for Sage to dish out his usual hip-hop centric offerings. So with this album, Copper Gone, it seems like Sage is hitting us hard with his SFR style of hip-hop that we all know and love, which is much to my delight. This album is one that you can listen to from beginning to end seamlessly. The songs I'm jamming out to currently include: ID Thieves, Cheat Code, Vonnegut Busy, and Thank you. Get this album, like any release from Strange Famous, it's worth your money. I'll be very surprised if I come across an album this year that can even match this project.

Jamezachary ,

Sheesh

This album just cured my erectile dysfunction. It makes me want to jazzercize. I just thanked my higher power for Sage Francis. I'm going to buy another copy.

seanthedad77 ,

Seanthedad77

Can't wait! Love the single. Sage's stuff is always solid.

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