11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Brooklyn-based trio Hospitality keep the rough edges of their self-titled debut with a second album, 2014’s Trouble; it also keeps a youthful wonder toward melodies and the interworkings of a trio. Even a smooth, late-'70s new wave/pop number like “I Miss Your Bones” features all the elements right in front of your ears. The guitar solo sticks out for its naked aggression, but the bass lines practically click with the steady drums (like in the days of The Jam) and singer Amber Papini double-tracks her voice for a disorienting effect. The synth turns on for the weird and trippy minimalism of the Vampire Weekend–suggestible “Inauguration,” while the band goes for a full-blown plush stereo sound on “Rockets and Jets,” where guitars and keyboards vamp with sophistication. “It’s Not Serious” recalls the simple metrics of Brill Building pop, with the acoustic “Sunship” turning that pop toward the psychedelic ends of Mellotron and harmony. The all-acoustic and bare “Call Me After” finishes the proper album. The bonus track “Bet” extends the acoustic mood but with additional instrumental cover.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Brooklyn-based trio Hospitality keep the rough edges of their self-titled debut with a second album, 2014’s Trouble; it also keeps a youthful wonder toward melodies and the interworkings of a trio. Even a smooth, late-'70s new wave/pop number like “I Miss Your Bones” features all the elements right in front of your ears. The guitar solo sticks out for its naked aggression, but the bass lines practically click with the steady drums (like in the days of The Jam) and singer Amber Papini double-tracks her voice for a disorienting effect. The synth turns on for the weird and trippy minimalism of the Vampire Weekend–suggestible “Inauguration,” while the band goes for a full-blown plush stereo sound on “Rockets and Jets,” where guitars and keyboards vamp with sophistication. “It’s Not Serious” recalls the simple metrics of Brill Building pop, with the acoustic “Sunship” turning that pop toward the psychedelic ends of Mellotron and harmony. The all-acoustic and bare “Call Me After” finishes the proper album. The bonus track “Bet” extends the acoustic mood but with additional instrumental cover.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Msteger ,

brilliant

Great disc— evocative lyrics (think New York School poetry) and some truly great music that draws on everything from The White Album to Fairport Convention to Velvet Underground to Moby—creating a unique and welcome sound all its own. The lead singer has a wonderful (occasionally Nico-esque) voice. This is an album for long and repeated listening.

raelity ,

Takes My Breath Away

As a 46 year old music fan, I was worried that Hospitality might be too young for me. How wrong can I be? Trouble is simply thrilling, fused with tight rhythms, obscure (yet entirely accessible) lyrics, and a modern sound thoroughly infused with New Wave influences. Dig The New Breed!

nobodyswatching ,

Good stuff

This band really knows how to put a song together. The instruments meld into lush tapestries while keeping their own lines. Subtle post-punk influence. Recommended if you like Metric.

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