10 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

England’s enigmatic WU LYF (World Unite Lucifer Youth Foundation, anyone?) pulls off an interesting feat: it merges a roar of discontent with a reassuring embrace, telling us that even though the world is messed up, everything will be okay: we will survive! Singer Ellery Roberts’ sandpapered yelp is similar to Future Island’s Samuel Herring, but Roberts is 90% indecipherable, which doesn’t deter fans from singing along, fists raised in solidarity with whatever it is he’s singing about. (When Roberts yowls a simple phrase like “I wanna feel at home,” it sounds more like “Whaa-fill-ay-yo!”) Actually, the magic of Roberts’ delivery is that an attuned listener quickly gets the gist of his message from the smashing crescendos, mercurial organ notes, and the fluttering guitar chords that go from reedy, chiming solemnity to chatty uplift between bridge and chorus. This isn’t date-night indie pop (though the joyful “We Bros” hints at it); it’s disillusioned protest music, an emotional steam-letting tool, a personal Monday morning resentment soundtrack. Don't be surprised if you end up growling along, waving your Bic lighter in the car on the way to work.

EDITORS’ NOTES

England’s enigmatic WU LYF (World Unite Lucifer Youth Foundation, anyone?) pulls off an interesting feat: it merges a roar of discontent with a reassuring embrace, telling us that even though the world is messed up, everything will be okay: we will survive! Singer Ellery Roberts’ sandpapered yelp is similar to Future Island’s Samuel Herring, but Roberts is 90% indecipherable, which doesn’t deter fans from singing along, fists raised in solidarity with whatever it is he’s singing about. (When Roberts yowls a simple phrase like “I wanna feel at home,” it sounds more like “Whaa-fill-ay-yo!”) Actually, the magic of Roberts’ delivery is that an attuned listener quickly gets the gist of his message from the smashing crescendos, mercurial organ notes, and the fluttering guitar chords that go from reedy, chiming solemnity to chatty uplift between bridge and chorus. This isn’t date-night indie pop (though the joyful “We Bros” hints at it); it’s disillusioned protest music, an emotional steam-letting tool, a personal Monday morning resentment soundtrack. Don't be surprised if you end up growling along, waving your Bic lighter in the car on the way to work.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
77 Ratings

77 Ratings

Chris the historical movie man ,

BRILLIANT

World Unite Lucifer Youth Foundation. What more can I say, this album is brilliant, I have been following them since they were releasing demos. This is deinitely the icing on the cake. My personal favs are "14 Crowns For Me & your friends" and Heavy Pop. They have an ambient yet darkening enlightenment about them.

Panasonicyouth04 ,

Hype

It's ok. They sound really reminiscent of Wilderness imho...I'd rather just listen to them instead. And the production isn't all that great, the drums kinda sound bad. All hype if you ask me.

Tony "Ducks" ,

Fugazi for this generation

I cant believe how many times I've listened to this album this week and im still digging it. The unusually catchy tunes, are unique, really dark, angst filled and inspirational. I love how much they use the sustain pedal on their piano. I feel like its an apathetic anthem for hope, The title of the song "such a a sad puppy dog" may appear to be a flippant nonsensical name, but i feel it is one of their deepest written tracks. Remind me of how i felt when i first heard Fugazi.

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