12 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bauhaus broke up in 1983 after five years of gothic drama; vocalist Peter Murphy went solo, while the others created new bands. Go Away White is the quartet's first album after 25 years apart, and the crucible honed their talents: The dive-bar-ready blues of "International Bulletproof Talent" and relentless motoring of "Adrenalin" find the group purring along while Murphy coolly hovers over the proceedings like Vincent Price. The album also folds in David J's love for dark cabaret ("Saved") and Murphy's interest in Middle Eastern sounds ("Zikir").

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bauhaus broke up in 1983 after five years of gothic drama; vocalist Peter Murphy went solo, while the others created new bands. Go Away White is the quartet's first album after 25 years apart, and the crucible honed their talents: The dive-bar-ready blues of "International Bulletproof Talent" and relentless motoring of "Adrenalin" find the group purring along while Murphy coolly hovers over the proceedings like Vincent Price. The album also folds in David J's love for dark cabaret ("Saved") and Murphy's interest in Middle Eastern sounds ("Zikir").

TITLE TIME
11
12

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
80 Ratings

80 Ratings

shoeprogram ,

a worthwhile comeback

this is a good album. it is true to bauhaus form. they are still a great band. endless summer of the damned is a great track

Jake Of America ,

More depth would have been nice.

I could not wait for new music from Bauhaus. While I do love this album and feel that it certainly IS an authentic and worthy addition to the Bauhaus discography, I do feel that the production of the album is missing some of the depth they had with thier earlier recordings. While I do like the gritty sound, we had gritty with Love and Rockets. Gritty is good for a portion of it, but what is missing is some of Dannys acoustic guitar strums over the grit. I think a little bit more of David J and Daniel Ash singing along would be nice. The etherical space on SAVED is certainly right on the mark. Now put some of that etherical space into other parts of it and that may have helped.

It also would have been nice to have 2 to 4 more songs to show of the range that we all know they have together.

Having said all of that, I do agree with an earlier statement that this reunion album sets the standard. It still sounds like Bauhaus, instead of an older version of Bauhaus trying to still sound like Bauhaus.

Can you imaging how bad the new PIxies album would have been if they had actually recorded it? Frank Black Francis just does not have that voice anymore. Fortunately Peter Murphy still sounds like Peter Murphy as does the rest of Bauhaus.

If you are new to Bauhaus, please do check out the rest of thier catalog. Anyone of them paired with this recording is a sure winner of experiencing the full scope of Bauhaus.

Now I must Go Away White.

Comradebot ,

Back and Suprisingly Not in Black

I believe this might be the only studio album by Bauhaus without any large amounts of black on it. But inside is something just as brilliant as what they released 25+ years ago. Classic Goth rock created in the modern era. As someone else stated, it does have a bit of a Bowie feel to it, but with the very distinct Bauhaus sound. Gone though are many of the cathartic yelps and screams that Peter Murphy liked to add, but I personally feel that might have been for the best. Big props to the droning dirge of "Saved", which made my skin tingle when I first heard it. "Andrenalin" drips with, well, adrenaline.

Recommended Tracks:
"Too Much 21st Century"
"Andrenalin"
"International Bulletproof Talent"
"Saved"
"The Dog's a Vapour"

To reiterate, brilliant album. Almost sounds like if Goth rock had existed in the mid 70s, if that makes since to anyone. Guess that goes back to the Bowie thing. Great album, buy it if you love Goth rock in general, or if you're an open-minded individual with a diverse love of good music from all ends of the spectrum.

This spectrum being black... that's going away white. I couldn't resist, shameful, I know.

More By Bauhaus

You May Also Like