9 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

1975’s Toys in the Attic broke this Boston group commercially, while the follow-up, 1976’s Rocks, the band’s fourth studio album, cemented Aerosmith’s reputation as the era’s most formidable hard rock band. Not nearly as radio-friendly (Attic had the title track, “Walk This Way” and “Sweet Emotion” leading its charge), Rocks came out firing on all cylinders. The hard-charging “Back in the Saddle” opens things brilliantly with guitarists Joe Perry and Brad Whitford working terse, syncopated riffs behind the quick-lipped sass of lead singer Steven Tyler, who plays it funky (“Last Child,” “Rats in the Cellar”), streetwise (“Lick and a Promise”) and sentimental (“Home Tonight”), alluding throughout to the band’s bad habits that would eventually knock them out of commission by the end of the decade. The thick, epic harmonies of “Sick as a Dog,” the nod to the Rolling Stones with Joe Perry’s “Combination” and the quaking metal assault of “Nobody’s Fault” and “Get the Lead Out” provide solid evidence for Aerosmith’s deserved reign as ‘70s rock legends and top festival draws. 

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

1975’s Toys in the Attic broke this Boston group commercially, while the follow-up, 1976’s Rocks, the band’s fourth studio album, cemented Aerosmith’s reputation as the era’s most formidable hard rock band. Not nearly as radio-friendly (Attic had the title track, “Walk This Way” and “Sweet Emotion” leading its charge), Rocks came out firing on all cylinders. The hard-charging “Back in the Saddle” opens things brilliantly with guitarists Joe Perry and Brad Whitford working terse, syncopated riffs behind the quick-lipped sass of lead singer Steven Tyler, who plays it funky (“Last Child,” “Rats in the Cellar”), streetwise (“Lick and a Promise”) and sentimental (“Home Tonight”), alluding throughout to the band’s bad habits that would eventually knock them out of commission by the end of the decade. The thick, epic harmonies of “Sick as a Dog,” the nod to the Rolling Stones with Joe Perry’s “Combination” and the quaking metal assault of “Nobody’s Fault” and “Get the Lead Out” provide solid evidence for Aerosmith’s deserved reign as ‘70s rock legends and top festival draws. 

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
98 Ratings

98 Ratings

wil1iam ,

magnus opus

no question about it, this is the best album aerosmith ever put out. every cut is a masterpiece. i love that this album so focuses on the hard rock sound and is not littered with the boogie woogie vaudeville type songs that dominated "toys in the attic" i consider this to be one of the best rock albums of all time

AnonL ,

Highwater Mark

This is by far Aerosmith's greatest album. Back in the Saddle, Rats in the Cellar, Combination, Nobody's Fault are some the hardest rocking songs this band ever put down. It was all clicking on this one, tight funky rhythms and stellar guitar work with the vocals sitting nicely in the mix instead of screeching over the top. Not quite heavy metal at the time, but no band rocked like this in the mid 70's - this is the real deal.

DoctorEpic465 ,

Aerosmith's Best Album

While most people look at Toys as the quintisential 70's Aerosmith album, Rocks is just a little bit better. It is definatley a heavier album but contains some of the bands best songs (i.e. the whole album). Definatley worth buying.

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