13 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a master instrumentalist with convincing everyman vocal skills, Mark Knopfler has had no trouble turning from rock music’s big stage to folk music’s modest ways and means. His solo career has enabled him to sit back and write story-songs that break on a sad, downtrodden note and spring to life on spirited ensemble playing. Deep down, Knopfler has always been a traditionalist and admirer of subtle touches. His own playing can effortlessly rustle up a manic flee of notes, but it’s the forlorn pennywhistle and fiddle of “Border Reiver,” the mournful organ of “Hard Shoulder” and the naturalistic acoustic guitars picking away in the background throughout that best serve Knopfler’s demeanor. “Cleaning My Gun” and “You Can’t Beat the House” add an extra shuffle, but the days of empowering electricity seem to have passed him by. The blues folds into Knopfler’s Celtic heritage and his yearning to bring the past into the present without defiling its honest spirit and tone. Sometimes he’s literal (“Before Gas and TV”) and other times it’s all in his hands (“So Far From the Clyde”).

EDITORS’ NOTES

As a master instrumentalist with convincing everyman vocal skills, Mark Knopfler has had no trouble turning from rock music’s big stage to folk music’s modest ways and means. His solo career has enabled him to sit back and write story-songs that break on a sad, downtrodden note and spring to life on spirited ensemble playing. Deep down, Knopfler has always been a traditionalist and admirer of subtle touches. His own playing can effortlessly rustle up a manic flee of notes, but it’s the forlorn pennywhistle and fiddle of “Border Reiver,” the mournful organ of “Hard Shoulder” and the naturalistic acoustic guitars picking away in the background throughout that best serve Knopfler’s demeanor. “Cleaning My Gun” and “You Can’t Beat the House” add an extra shuffle, but the days of empowering electricity seem to have passed him by. The blues folds into Knopfler’s Celtic heritage and his yearning to bring the past into the present without defiling its honest spirit and tone. Sometimes he’s literal (“Before Gas and TV”) and other times it’s all in his hands (“So Far From the Clyde”).

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

BeltaneTREX ,

Awesome, creative & Unusual Bonus Track.

"Early Bird" is a wonderfully strange, mellow, but faster paced Knopfler obscurity that kind of defies a categorical definition. There is a faint echo of wah-pedal and funky lush synth setting the groove in the background as Knopfler's delightfully sarcastic lyric verses about spoiled high society steadily build a manic momentum which ultimately culminates into a surprisingly playful melodic chorus.
The chorus seems to be a lyrical twist on both "Long black Veil" and "Swing Low Sweet Chariot" though with unapolgetic materialistic lust for a car (a common Knopflerian subject, see both "The Car Was the One" and "Summer of Love"). Perhaps the "long black Cadillac" Knopfler sings about references a hearse taking the deluded aristocrat character to the grave. In any case, this is a wonderful and creative song from Mark Knopfler, guitar and song-witing master.

"Time in the Sun" is not worth a penny honestly. Sounds like the illegitimate child of a half-baked notion of a possibility of a song. It's essentially a repeated chord progression with equally repetetive lyrics about people wanting their time in the sun....over and over and over again. "Early Bird" is Knopfler in folk-rock maestro form, "Time in the Sun" is essentially Mark dinking around the studio without any concrete song idea.

TUT14 ,

He's done it again!!!!

Mark Knopfler is one of the best music writers out there, and also one of the most talented guitar players ever. He brings back the true quality of music that sadly, has almost totally left our society (besides Coldplay). This has to be my favorite album besides Shrangi La and Sailing to Philadelphia. Teenagers like me really need to start appreciating this kind of music!

PUSHrod ,

Get Lucky

The best change is growth. Mark Knopfler has continued to change and grow. To my delight, as I matured and left childish things behind, I did not have to abandon listening to Knopfler, rather he has provided new depths for me to explore with every replaying of his music. Get Lucky continues with this trait.

I hear ancient chords and subtle rythem, exquisite pacing and hinted crecendos. Not a clunker cut nor a throw-away track on the album. The fact that the engineering is gorgeous is just icing on the cake. No regrets about the purchase, it's nice insulation from the dreck that get played on the radio.

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