9 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released in 1970, Rod Stewart's second solo album was a radical departure from the heavy electric blues of the star-crossed Jeff Beck Group and Stones-shaggy sound of The Faces, the singer's then contemporaneous band (and core of the session players here). Stewart's acoustic-focused slate of smart covers and recent-vintage rock may have been influenced by the folksy, back-to-roots sentiments of the era, but they also came recast with sultry vocal performances that quickly drew comparisons with the American r&b pantheon. Indeed, the singer weaves material as disparate as Elton John's "Country Comfort," the Stones' "It's All Over Now" and especially his bittersweet take on Dylan's "Only A Hobo" in compelling new ways, willfully blurring the lines between rock, folk and blues and setting the table for his breakthrough Every Picture Tells a Story. It's all charged with a restless, infectious energy missing from so many other rootsy conceits, a compelling argument that true rock power has more to do with the size the heart than the wattage of the amp.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Released in 1970, Rod Stewart's second solo album was a radical departure from the heavy electric blues of the star-crossed Jeff Beck Group and Stones-shaggy sound of The Faces, the singer's then contemporaneous band (and core of the session players here). Stewart's acoustic-focused slate of smart covers and recent-vintage rock may have been influenced by the folksy, back-to-roots sentiments of the era, but they also came recast with sultry vocal performances that quickly drew comparisons with the American r&b pantheon. Indeed, the singer weaves material as disparate as Elton John's "Country Comfort," the Stones' "It's All Over Now" and especially his bittersweet take on Dylan's "Only A Hobo" in compelling new ways, willfully blurring the lines between rock, folk and blues and setting the table for his breakthrough Every Picture Tells a Story. It's all charged with a restless, infectious energy missing from so many other rootsy conceits, a compelling argument that true rock power has more to do with the size the heart than the wattage of the amp.

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