11 Songs, 1 Hour 4 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

To mark the release of 2012’s Umskiptar—Burzum’s fourth post-prison album—Varg Vikernes took to calling his music “scaldic metal,” a reference to the ancient bardic traditions of his native Norway. Though Vikernes’s intention was to distance himself from the black metal scene that he'd helped invent, “scaldic” is an apt term for the music on Umpskiptar, which is more focused on atmosphere and lyrics than any of Burzum’s previous works. Tracks like “Aera,” “Heidr,” and “Surtr Sunnan” are more like monologues set to music than traditional songs, as Varg adopts a stoic half-spoken rasp to illustrate excerpts from the 10th-century pagan poem “Völuspá,” one of the foundational sources of Norse mythology. For the most part, Varg here abandons the seething screams that made him famous—but that doesn’t mean the music is less intense. With squalls of uneasy guitars, “Joln,” “Alfadanz,” and “Hit Helga Tre” get to the essence of Burzum. Meanwhile, “Valgaldr" and “Gullaldr”—songs informed by ancient chants—push Burzum’s interest in pagan ritual to new realms of spookiness.

EDITORS’ NOTES

To mark the release of 2012’s Umskiptar—Burzum’s fourth post-prison album—Varg Vikernes took to calling his music “scaldic metal,” a reference to the ancient bardic traditions of his native Norway. Though Vikernes’s intention was to distance himself from the black metal scene that he'd helped invent, “scaldic” is an apt term for the music on Umpskiptar, which is more focused on atmosphere and lyrics than any of Burzum’s previous works. Tracks like “Aera,” “Heidr,” and “Surtr Sunnan” are more like monologues set to music than traditional songs, as Varg adopts a stoic half-spoken rasp to illustrate excerpts from the 10th-century pagan poem “Völuspá,” one of the foundational sources of Norse mythology. For the most part, Varg here abandons the seething screams that made him famous—but that doesn’t mean the music is less intense. With squalls of uneasy guitars, “Joln,” “Alfadanz,” and “Hit Helga Tre” get to the essence of Burzum. Meanwhile, “Valgaldr" and “Gullaldr”—songs informed by ancient chants—push Burzum’s interest in pagan ritual to new realms of spookiness.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.9 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

jacobmeyerson ,

aww

Im miss the old shrieking vocals that i know and love

gterhro911 ,

Breathtaking from start to finish!!

Honestly, I'm not gonna beat around the bush, this album will appeal to half the group of Burzum fans but won't to the other half, and won't appeal to anyone who isn't into Burzum. For me, this is just an amazing work of art at best, and it clearly demonstrates Varg's progression with all of the instruments you hear, this seems more mature than the old Burzum which is good ( Don't get me wrong I LOVE old Burzum ), but don't look for another self-entitled like album or filosofem which a number of people said that this album is like which it is not. Also to the guy who said that this album from a story telling point of view doesn't appear to him cause it's in Norwegian, I just wanted to clear up that it's not in Norwegian, it's Icelandic.

Infinite Sound ,

Great album

As a huge Burzum fan, I was surprised when I heard this album for the first time. The album is not as dark as Burzum's earlier works. The low production is gone, along with the cold, savage sound that has made Burzum one of the most evil musicans ever. Despite the drastic change, Burzum still demonstrates his greatness. The songs are folkish, but powerful. Each song is crafted perfectly. This album is a work of art.

More By Burzum

You May Also Like