12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though there are still traces of bossa nova on Gal Costa’s sophomore album, it’s mostly a chance to marvel at how effortlessly (and beautifully) she pairs with tropicália’s strikingly chromatic soundscapes. The fuzzy guitars on “Namorinho de Portão,” the celestial strings on “Baby,” the manic percussion on “Sebastiana”—she powers through them with gusto and drama. A lesser singer may have gotten lost in the haze of American rock 'n' roll, British psychedelia, and Brazilian rhythms, but Costa thrives.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though there are still traces of bossa nova on Gal Costa’s sophomore album, it’s mostly a chance to marvel at how effortlessly (and beautifully) she pairs with tropicália’s strikingly chromatic soundscapes. The fuzzy guitars on “Namorinho de Portão,” the celestial strings on “Baby,” the manic percussion on “Sebastiana”—she powers through them with gusto and drama. A lesser singer may have gotten lost in the haze of American rock 'n' roll, British psychedelia, and Brazilian rhythms, but Costa thrives.

TITLE TIME

More By Gal Costa