8 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Endless Boogie lives up to their moniker with a hard-chooglin’ sophomore album where almost every song plays past the eight-minute mark. Full House Head is a time machine of bastardized blues-rock and Southern-steeped swagger resonating without anachronistic tones – from the opening “Empty Eye” it sounds like these tunes could have been mixed in the early ‘70s by Frank Zappa (who would have enjoyed their Captain Beefheart-esque attack on roots-rock). Though throughout Full House Head Matt Sweeney follows a Neil Michael Hagerty approach to emulating his guitar heroes via forward thinking. “Pack Your Bags” finds him taking Hendrix-inspired licks past the point of no return with meandering modal notes that come closer to freeform jazz freak-outs than acid- rock undulations, while “Mighty Fine Pie” waxes Southern rock before repetitive riffs become the kind of pulsing, hypnotic mantras that Spacemen3 used to melt minds. And the ending “A Life Worth Living” is 22-plus minutes of classic rock played with doom metal’s penchant for patience.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Endless Boogie lives up to their moniker with a hard-chooglin’ sophomore album where almost every song plays past the eight-minute mark. Full House Head is a time machine of bastardized blues-rock and Southern-steeped swagger resonating without anachronistic tones – from the opening “Empty Eye” it sounds like these tunes could have been mixed in the early ‘70s by Frank Zappa (who would have enjoyed their Captain Beefheart-esque attack on roots-rock). Though throughout Full House Head Matt Sweeney follows a Neil Michael Hagerty approach to emulating his guitar heroes via forward thinking. “Pack Your Bags” finds him taking Hendrix-inspired licks past the point of no return with meandering modal notes that come closer to freeform jazz freak-outs than acid- rock undulations, while “Mighty Fine Pie” waxes Southern rock before repetitive riffs become the kind of pulsing, hypnotic mantras that Spacemen3 used to melt minds. And the ending “A Life Worth Living” is 22-plus minutes of classic rock played with doom metal’s penchant for patience.

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