6 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s sometimes hard to imagine a harmonious (much less fun) relationship between art and rock. Yet this 1972 Genesis album, their fourth, is proof that opposites attract, and the progeny can be disarming, powerful, and even beautiful. From the mellotron-stoked science fiction of “Watcher of the Skies” (which climbs to anthemic levels) to the character-driven fusion of “Get ’Em Out by Friday” and the biblical prog-rock suite of “Supper’s Ready,” the conflict and precociousness—already so embedded in the lyrics—find common musical ground. Foxtrot is an art-rock masterpiece where detachment and passion work together unflappably.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s sometimes hard to imagine a harmonious (much less fun) relationship between art and rock. Yet this 1972 Genesis album, their fourth, is proof that opposites attract, and the progeny can be disarming, powerful, and even beautiful. From the mellotron-stoked science fiction of “Watcher of the Skies” (which climbs to anthemic levels) to the character-driven fusion of “Get ’Em Out by Friday” and the biblical prog-rock suite of “Supper’s Ready,” the conflict and precociousness—already so embedded in the lyrics—find common musical ground. Foxtrot is an art-rock masterpiece where detachment and passion work together unflappably.

TITLE TIME

More By Genesis

You May Also Like