13 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of British quartet Bloc Party have been wondering if the band would put aside solo ventures and side projects in favor of a full-blown reunion. Four answers this question loudly in the affirmative with a vigorous album that pick up where 2008’s Intimacy left off. As before, Bloc Party owes much to the abrasive likes of Gang of Four, Sonic Youth and similar ‘80s-era groups. It also displays a savvy pop sensibility that imbeds hooks deep within its snarling riffage and jackhammer grooves. Singer Kele Okereke shape-shifts his way through these tracks, turning into a punk agitator in “So He Begins to Lie,” a teasing soul man in “3x3” and a suave balladeer in “Truth.” The music here is equally diverse, veering from the spiky pop of “Octopus” to the visceral blues of “Coliseum” and the mauling at-rock of “We Are Not Good People.” Guitarist Russell Lissack especially does yeoman service, unleashing ferociously gargled notes in “Kettling” and nerve-jangling strums on “Team A.” Bloc Party throws sharp elbows at every opportunity, yet never slips into gratuitous noise.

Apple Digital Master

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of British quartet Bloc Party have been wondering if the band would put aside solo ventures and side projects in favor of a full-blown reunion. Four answers this question loudly in the affirmative with a vigorous album that pick up where 2008’s Intimacy left off. As before, Bloc Party owes much to the abrasive likes of Gang of Four, Sonic Youth and similar ‘80s-era groups. It also displays a savvy pop sensibility that imbeds hooks deep within its snarling riffage and jackhammer grooves. Singer Kele Okereke shape-shifts his way through these tracks, turning into a punk agitator in “So He Begins to Lie,” a teasing soul man in “3x3” and a suave balladeer in “Truth.” The music here is equally diverse, veering from the spiky pop of “Octopus” to the visceral blues of “Coliseum” and the mauling at-rock of “We Are Not Good People.” Guitarist Russell Lissack especially does yeoman service, unleashing ferociously gargled notes in “Kettling” and nerve-jangling strums on “Team A.” Bloc Party throws sharp elbows at every opportunity, yet never slips into gratuitous noise.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
288 Ratings

288 Ratings

adray14 ,

FIRST!

I already heard the album, it's fantastic minus a few mediocre songs. Definetly worth the buy, they're getting back to their roots on this one!

Progressivemilkhotel ,

No Silent Alarm...

But it is way closer than Intimacy was. A solid effort in the right direction Bloc Party.

ChadReb ,

"it's a no go" and I think so.

The album has shinning moments, but ultimately drowns in anti-climatic structures and fails to engage the listener. I enjoyed 5 tracks, 3 were amazing and up-beat, and 2 were just nice and sweet. The rest of the record just doesn't cut it. It almost seems the band was trying to be creative, and go for a heavy sound somewhat reminiscent to "smashing pumpkins" but they fail to deliver, and it just sounds cheesy. Sorry guys.

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