20 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Sarah McLachlan exists in her own time and space. Times change, but McLachlan remains true to her original visions. In conjunction with the restart of Lilith Fair, McLachlan releases her first album of new material in seven years. It’s exactly what a McLachlan fan would want and expect. Longtime producer Pierre Marchand applies the adult-contemporary gloss, while McLachlan sings her folk-pop heart out with songs of spiritual renewal. “Awakenings,” “Loving You Is Easy,” the piano ballad “Forgiveness” and the rallying buzz of “Don’t Give Up On Us” come together as yet another assured album of effortless grace and genuine talent. In some ways, it makes McLachlan sound almost old-fashioned, as she offers up songs that could easily fit onto her other albums. (“Rivers of Love” could easily fit in on 2003’s Afterglow). Like a modern-day folksinger clinging to her values, McLachlan doesn’t compromise or try to become the next big thing.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Sarah McLachlan exists in her own time and space. Times change, but McLachlan remains true to her original visions. In conjunction with the restart of Lilith Fair, McLachlan releases her first album of new material in seven years. It’s exactly what a McLachlan fan would want and expect. Longtime producer Pierre Marchand applies the adult-contemporary gloss, while McLachlan sings her folk-pop heart out with songs of spiritual renewal. “Awakenings,” “Loving You Is Easy,” the piano ballad “Forgiveness” and the rallying buzz of “Don’t Give Up On Us” come together as yet another assured album of effortless grace and genuine talent. In some ways, it makes McLachlan sound almost old-fashioned, as she offers up songs that could easily fit onto her other albums. (“Rivers of Love” could easily fit in on 2003’s Afterglow). Like a modern-day folksinger clinging to her values, McLachlan doesn’t compromise or try to become the next big thing.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
264 Ratings

264 Ratings

Empathicjoe ,

Welcome Back Sarah

It's been seven long years and about 200 versions of "Angel" and "I Will Remember You", but rest assured, Ms. McLachlan delivers another gorgeous piece of work here. Her usual moody pieces are highlighted by some surprisingly upbeat tunes, and the mix is divine. I fell in love with Sarah during the "Surfacing" era, and backtracked thru her catalogue . . I am amazed that I didn't wear the finish of "Fumbling Toward Ecstasy", and I can safely say that this new album will be on my iPod for at least the next month or so.
I seriously could listen to this woman sing the phone book and I would be entranced. Sadly, I won't be able to make it to Lilith this summer, so I am crossing my fingers for a solo tour this fall.
Welcome back Sarah, and welcome home Sarah fans. Another gorgeous piece of work!!

feeniix6 ,

REAL MUSIC

Im so glad Sarah is finally back. Its about time artist with talent and meaning with their lyrics made a come back. I just hope radio gives her some type of air time. (We all know that the radio has gone to sh#$!

melinchicago ,

Good, but overproduced

I've been a big Sarah fan for many, many years. I find her best work to be when it's just her and a piano. This new CD, while good (not great), is too overproduced. Everything sounds like background noise that doesn't showcase her beautiful voice and risks overpowering her vocal talent.

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