10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the great multi-instrumentalist David Lindley adding his musical voice to Jackson Browne’s nuanced songs of love and loss, For Everyman is an entrancing follow-up to his stellar self-titled debut (also known as Saturate Before Using). The Eagles had a hit with his “Take It Easy” (Glenn Frey adding a verse when Browne didn’t complete the song), and “These Days” became a calling card for Gregg Allman. Browne turns up the rock ‘n’ roll for “Redneck Friend” but elsewhere finds his groove as a singer/songwriter with an eloquent way of saying things. “Our Lady of the Well,” “Colors of the Sun,” and “The Times You’ve Come” show rich lyricism balanced with melodies that ache and weep like no other early-‘70s music, shy of Neil Young’s. Browne’s excellence comes to a dramatic close with the epic “For Everyman.” However, his lighter side comes to the surface on the joyful “Ready or Not” about pending fatherhood. All of Browne’s ‘70s work is essential. It’s scary to think that he’d actually surpass himself with his next album, the classic Late for the Sky.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the great multi-instrumentalist David Lindley adding his musical voice to Jackson Browne’s nuanced songs of love and loss, For Everyman is an entrancing follow-up to his stellar self-titled debut (also known as Saturate Before Using). The Eagles had a hit with his “Take It Easy” (Glenn Frey adding a verse when Browne didn’t complete the song), and “These Days” became a calling card for Gregg Allman. Browne turns up the rock ‘n’ roll for “Redneck Friend” but elsewhere finds his groove as a singer/songwriter with an eloquent way of saying things. “Our Lady of the Well,” “Colors of the Sun,” and “The Times You’ve Come” show rich lyricism balanced with melodies that ache and weep like no other early-‘70s music, shy of Neil Young’s. Browne’s excellence comes to a dramatic close with the epic “For Everyman.” However, his lighter side comes to the surface on the joyful “Ready or Not” about pending fatherhood. All of Browne’s ‘70s work is essential. It’s scary to think that he’d actually surpass himself with his next album, the classic Late for the Sky.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

Old DW ,

Title Says it All

This is Jackson Browne at his finest. For me, this album began a lifelong appreciation for thoughtful, lyrical music. Jackson’s version of `Take it Easy’ is better than the Eagles’ version and `These Days’ may be Jackson’s best song. While his depth is shown off by songs like `Colors Of The Sun’, `The Times You've Come’, `Sing My Songs To Me’ and ` For Everyman’, he shows his lighter side with `Red Neck Friend’ and `Ready or Not’. This album is truly a gift to all of us.

David Byrne 77 ,

Increadible

Finally iTunes got its hands on the rights to this entire album, which is one of Browne's best, up there with Jackson Browne (or Saturate Before Using), and Late For the Sky. It is also a necessity for any Browne fan to own. Everysone is awesome material and increadibly insightful on the part of Browne, unlike some of his later work. Tracks 1, 5, 6, and 10 are some of my favorites, and Browne had some awesome artists join him, including David Lindley on slide guitar, backups Don Henley and Glenn Fry from the Eagels, as well as David Crosby and Bonnie Raitt, and Elton John as painist on Red Neck Friend (called Rockaday Johnnie in the liner notes). Also, These Days, covered by Gregg Allman and Nico, is probably the most amazing track on the album. Buy it now!

novice snob ,

Compete Jackson Browne

For Everyman is arguably the strongest album top-to-bottom Browne has ever recorded. Every song is at least a triple if not a homerun. Great textures and even better lyrics, which range from dreamlike (Colors of the Sun, Sing My Songs to Me), humorous (Red Neck Friend, Ready Or Not), or the glorious meloncholy and introspection he is best known for. It blows my mind Browne wrote the poignant "These Days" in his teens! Not just that, David Lindley's weepy guitar is just as jaw dropping. The album ends with a segue to the opus "For Everyman", which still stands with the bes of Browne's work. This is one of the gems in Browne's catalogue for sure.

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