12 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There was tension in the band due to the breakup of singer/guitarist Mac McCaughan and bassist Laura Ballance. It’s reflected in the album’s terse sound and Ballance’s grim cover art, and McCaughan sounds wrung out on many of the album’s most powerful tracks. Recorded with Brian Paulson in Minneapolis and mixed at Steve Albini’s Chicago studio, Foolish captures Superchunk moving past the high-spirited energy of its early work and settling into a tougher, grinding sound. The guitars are positively snarling throughout. “Why Do You Have to Put a Date on Everything” takes power pop and puts it through the shredder. “Like a Fool” lingers with foreboding chords churning with the grunge era’s anger and disappointment. “The First Part” throws up deliciously discordant post-punk that resolves into a perfect hook. “Revelations” provides a wall of merciless sound. “Without Blinking” marshals the troops for a passionate song of sorrow. The pain here is palpable, but it spurs the group to great heights. The 2011 reissue includes remastered sound that brings out the best in a powerful production.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There was tension in the band due to the breakup of singer/guitarist Mac McCaughan and bassist Laura Ballance. It’s reflected in the album’s terse sound and Ballance’s grim cover art, and McCaughan sounds wrung out on many of the album’s most powerful tracks. Recorded with Brian Paulson in Minneapolis and mixed at Steve Albini’s Chicago studio, Foolish captures Superchunk moving past the high-spirited energy of its early work and settling into a tougher, grinding sound. The guitars are positively snarling throughout. “Why Do You Have to Put a Date on Everything” takes power pop and puts it through the shredder. “Like a Fool” lingers with foreboding chords churning with the grunge era’s anger and disappointment. “The First Part” throws up deliciously discordant post-punk that resolves into a perfect hook. “Revelations” provides a wall of merciless sound. “Without Blinking” marshals the troops for a passionate song of sorrow. The pain here is palpable, but it spurs the group to great heights. The 2011 reissue includes remastered sound that brings out the best in a powerful production.

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