16 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

First Thangs documents the P-Funk collective in its earliest incarnation, before George Clinton had fully determined the differences between the Parliament and Funkadelic outfits. Tracks 7 through 17 comprise the original 1970 release of Parliament’s debut LP, Osmium, an album that has more in common with early Funkadelic releases like Maggot Brain than it does with Parliament’s later output. “I Call My Baby Pussycat,” “There Is Nothing Before Me But Thang,” and “Funky Woman” are among the heaviest tracks in the P-Funk canon, and every bit the equal of early Funkadelic. The original version of “Red Hot Mama” included here sounds like something Jimi Hendrix would have made, had he been a biker and not a flower child. On the other hand, “Little Old Country Boy,” “Oh Lord, Why Lord” and “The Silent Boatman” display George Clinton’s penchant for eccentric instrumentation, including but not limited to harpsichord, bagpipes, and pedal steel. “My Automobile” reveals the band’s doo-wop roots, while an extended jam of “Loose Booty” hints at the laid-back, steady groove that would become Paliament’s signature in the years to come.

EDITORS’ NOTES

First Thangs documents the P-Funk collective in its earliest incarnation, before George Clinton had fully determined the differences between the Parliament and Funkadelic outfits. Tracks 7 through 17 comprise the original 1970 release of Parliament’s debut LP, Osmium, an album that has more in common with early Funkadelic releases like Maggot Brain than it does with Parliament’s later output. “I Call My Baby Pussycat,” “There Is Nothing Before Me But Thang,” and “Funky Woman” are among the heaviest tracks in the P-Funk canon, and every bit the equal of early Funkadelic. The original version of “Red Hot Mama” included here sounds like something Jimi Hendrix would have made, had he been a biker and not a flower child. On the other hand, “Little Old Country Boy,” “Oh Lord, Why Lord” and “The Silent Boatman” display George Clinton’s penchant for eccentric instrumentation, including but not limited to harpsichord, bagpipes, and pedal steel. “My Automobile” reveals the band’s doo-wop roots, while an extended jam of “Loose Booty” hints at the laid-back, steady groove that would become Paliament’s signature in the years to come.

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