Editors’ Notes Recorded in 1968 and released in 1969, this documented another time of transition for Miles Davis. These would be the final recordings of the trumpeter with drummer Tony Williams, saxophonist Wayne Shorter, keyboardist Herbie Hancock, and bassist Ron Carter, with the latter two being replaced by Chick Corea and Dave Holland (who appear on “Frelon Brun” and “Mademoiselle Mabry”). Some bemoan that this album is the second great quintet’s demise, but it’s fascinating to hear that band’s unique sound in the electric format instead of the cut-and-paste production that would mark later electric albums. Davis sounds particularly assertive on both versions of the standout “Tout de Suite,” with the alternate version the hotter of the two. While plugged-in Carter sounds tentative on the title track and “Petit Machines,” Hancock plays seamlessly on Fender Rhodes alongside strong performances by Davis and Williams. It’s worth noting that Davis was obsessed at the time with Jimi Hendrix and James Brown; “Mademoiselle Mabry” was Davis' take on “The Wind Cries Mary,” while “Frelon Brun” was inspired by “Cold Sweat.”

1
5:40
 
2
14:06
 
3
8:08
 
4
12:03
 
5
16:34
 

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