29 Songs, 2 Hours 26 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time Soundgarden taped their 2013 set at Los Angeles’ Wiltern Theatre for the long-running PBS show Live From the Artists Den, they were three years into what by all measures was a pretty successful reunion: They’d released new music (2012’s King Animal), had been touring steadily without looking eager or cash-grabby, and above all seemed like a band trying to navigate the future instead of trade solely on their past—a past that made them far more famous than any of their members were prepared for.

Listening to the performance here, what stands out is just how unique their sound was. Yes, they could be heavy and gut-churning (“Outshined,” “Rusty Cage,” “My Wave”), but they could also be ethereal, almost delicate (“Fell on Black Days,” “Black Hole Sun,” “4th of July”—introduced here by Chris Cornell as a song about “being really, really, really f**ked up on acid somewhere in the vicinity of America’s Independence Day”)—a vision of hard rock both experimental and remarkably easy to grasp. That the King Animal material sounds comfortable in context makes Cornell’s 2017 suicide that much more painful. A strong parting shot from a band that seemed like they still had room to grow.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time Soundgarden taped their 2013 set at Los Angeles’ Wiltern Theatre for the long-running PBS show Live From the Artists Den, they were three years into what by all measures was a pretty successful reunion: They’d released new music (2012’s King Animal), had been touring steadily without looking eager or cash-grabby, and above all seemed like a band trying to navigate the future instead of trade solely on their past—a past that made them far more famous than any of their members were prepared for.

Listening to the performance here, what stands out is just how unique their sound was. Yes, they could be heavy and gut-churning (“Outshined,” “Rusty Cage,” “My Wave”), but they could also be ethereal, almost delicate (“Fell on Black Days,” “Black Hole Sun,” “4th of July”—introduced here by Chris Cornell as a song about “being really, really, really f**ked up on acid somewhere in the vicinity of America’s Independence Day”)—a vision of hard rock both experimental and remarkably easy to grasp. That the King Animal material sounds comfortable in context makes Cornell’s 2017 suicide that much more painful. A strong parting shot from a band that seemed like they still had room to grow.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

drew1971 ,

Never again

There will never be another one like him......RIP Chris

jkdgun ,

If only to remember him by

Extremely rare vocal talent fronting this highly talented and power crunched band of perfectionists. What a great sound that will not easily be forgotten. Much love to Chris for all that he did for us.

uriufbyfjookgfr ,

RIP Chris Cornell

We will always remember you.

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