12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The beauty of a concise greatest-hits collection is that it gives listeners the condensed version of an artist’s career. While artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan had enough hits and key album tracks to fill several of these 12-track albums a few times over, most artists can be summed up fairly concisely in a dozen songs. Cat Stevens experimented with a number of different directions over the years, and he has a good second dozen of worthy deep album cuts to ponder. But this Millennium Collection is paced so perfectly that it plays like a piece of art itself. “The Wind” illustrates just how quickly a talented songwriter can capture an audience and silence them with beauty. “Wild World” is universally known, while “Where Do the Children Play?,” “Moonshadow,” “Peace Train,” “Father and Son,” “Sitting," and “Morning Has Broken” define the singer/songwriter folk-pop wave of the early '70s in true stereo. What an era. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

The beauty of a concise greatest-hits collection is that it gives listeners the condensed version of an artist’s career. While artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and Bob Dylan had enough hits and key album tracks to fill several of these 12-track albums a few times over, most artists can be summed up fairly concisely in a dozen songs. Cat Stevens experimented with a number of different directions over the years, and he has a good second dozen of worthy deep album cuts to ponder. But this Millennium Collection is paced so perfectly that it plays like a piece of art itself. “The Wind” illustrates just how quickly a talented songwriter can capture an audience and silence them with beauty. “Wild World” is universally known, while “Where Do the Children Play?,” “Moonshadow,” “Peace Train,” “Father and Son,” “Sitting," and “Morning Has Broken” define the singer/songwriter folk-pop wave of the early '70s in true stereo. What an era. 

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