18 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Of Montreal’s tenth release is dominated by glitzy, hooky, synth-funk in the vein of “I Feel Ya’ Strutter,” “Like a Tourist,” and “Girl Named Hello” with Kevin Barnes singing in a skittering multi-tracked falsetto that instantly brings to mind Prince (or a Prince parody). The songs run breathlessly from one glossy jam to the next, occasionally shifting gears as on the guitar-driven “Coquet Coquette” or the bitter ballad “Casualty of You.” It’s sprawling and dense, and chockfull of the oddball, stream-of-consciousness lyrics that Barnes favors. What makes this release different from previous albums is there seems to be a method behind the madness. Barnes is restless but not erratic. The songs are fuller and fleshed out and sound more crafted and less like a frenzied collage of ideas. Many even contain catchy sing-along choruses. Mostly though the album is pure adrenaline fun with a hint of underlying doom — you know the party is nearly over but not quite yet. In the end, False Priest straddles the moment between Saturday night’s cathartic release and the inevitable Sunday morning letdown.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Of Montreal’s tenth release is dominated by glitzy, hooky, synth-funk in the vein of “I Feel Ya’ Strutter,” “Like a Tourist,” and “Girl Named Hello” with Kevin Barnes singing in a skittering multi-tracked falsetto that instantly brings to mind Prince (or a Prince parody). The songs run breathlessly from one glossy jam to the next, occasionally shifting gears as on the guitar-driven “Coquet Coquette” or the bitter ballad “Casualty of You.” It’s sprawling and dense, and chockfull of the oddball, stream-of-consciousness lyrics that Barnes favors. What makes this release different from previous albums is there seems to be a method behind the madness. Barnes is restless but not erratic. The songs are fuller and fleshed out and sound more crafted and less like a frenzied collage of ideas. Many even contain catchy sing-along choruses. Mostly though the album is pure adrenaline fun with a hint of underlying doom — you know the party is nearly over but not quite yet. In the end, False Priest straddles the moment between Saturday night’s cathartic release and the inevitable Sunday morning letdown.

TITLE TIME
16
17
18

More By of Montreal

You May Also Like