14 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Tony Visconti producing and Bob Clearmountain mixing, Alejandro Escovedo’s 2010 release, Streets Songs of Love, is one Escovedo’s toughest-sounding albums to date. The guitars punch, the drums kick, the back-up singers trace every step and Escovedo becomes a glam-rocker, or at least a well-heeled Bowery Bum from years past, walking the rain-slicked streets looking for love. Veteran rockers show their support. Bruce Springsteen shows up for a duet of “Faith.” Ian Hunter lends his vocals to the ballad “Down In the Bowery,” which could be a Willy DeVille or a Jesse Malin number, depending on which generation you recall. The title track sparks from a walking funk backbeat. “This Bed Is Getting Crowded,” “Tender Heart” and “Undesired” are amped-up anthems, co-written with Chuck Prophet, that suggest what the E Street Band might sound like with a few more watts. “After the Meteor Showers” recalls the heartbreaking balladry of John Hiatt. “Tula” adds a noirscape to its funky blues. “Man from Japan” ends things with Escovedo sounding like David Bowie rumbling through the Earth after the apocalypse.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With Tony Visconti producing and Bob Clearmountain mixing, Alejandro Escovedo’s 2010 release, Streets Songs of Love, is one Escovedo’s toughest-sounding albums to date. The guitars punch, the drums kick, the back-up singers trace every step and Escovedo becomes a glam-rocker, or at least a well-heeled Bowery Bum from years past, walking the rain-slicked streets looking for love. Veteran rockers show their support. Bruce Springsteen shows up for a duet of “Faith.” Ian Hunter lends his vocals to the ballad “Down In the Bowery,” which could be a Willy DeVille or a Jesse Malin number, depending on which generation you recall. The title track sparks from a walking funk backbeat. “This Bed Is Getting Crowded,” “Tender Heart” and “Undesired” are amped-up anthems, co-written with Chuck Prophet, that suggest what the E Street Band might sound like with a few more watts. “After the Meteor Showers” recalls the heartbreaking balladry of John Hiatt. “Tula” adds a noirscape to its funky blues. “Man from Japan” ends things with Escovedo sounding like David Bowie rumbling through the Earth after the apocalypse.

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