11 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1979, Journey had became so embedded inside the psyche of America’s youth that it’s safe to guess there wasn’t a single high school prom that didn’t feature “Lovin’, Touchin’, Squeezin’” as its slow-dance centerpiece tune. That song (inspired by Sam Cooke’s “Nothin’ Can Change This Love”) helped launch this album, the band’s fifth, into the pop stratosphere, where Journey would stay throughout the '80s. Like the previous year’s Infinity, Evolution was produced by Roy Thomas Baker (The Cars, Queen). Baker helped the band replace their prog-rock obsessions with teen tearjerkers (“Too Late,” “Daydream”), scorching power ballads (“Sweet and Simple”), and riff-heavy hard rockers with massive choruses (“Do You Recall” and the FM-radio classic “Just the Same Way,” sung by former Journey lead singer and band keyboardist Gregg Rolie). Evolution is an incredibly articulated album of pop-rock, and it’s hard not to love. It’s also hard not to appreciate now how Journey (especially the gifted duo of singer Steve Perry and guitarist Neal Schon) were playing with as much passion as rock ’n’ roll in the late '70s would allow.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1979, Journey had became so embedded inside the psyche of America’s youth that it’s safe to guess there wasn’t a single high school prom that didn’t feature “Lovin’, Touchin’, Squeezin’” as its slow-dance centerpiece tune. That song (inspired by Sam Cooke’s “Nothin’ Can Change This Love”) helped launch this album, the band’s fifth, into the pop stratosphere, where Journey would stay throughout the '80s. Like the previous year’s Infinity, Evolution was produced by Roy Thomas Baker (The Cars, Queen). Baker helped the band replace their prog-rock obsessions with teen tearjerkers (“Too Late,” “Daydream”), scorching power ballads (“Sweet and Simple”), and riff-heavy hard rockers with massive choruses (“Do You Recall” and the FM-radio classic “Just the Same Way,” sung by former Journey lead singer and band keyboardist Gregg Rolie). Evolution is an incredibly articulated album of pop-rock, and it’s hard not to love. It’s also hard not to appreciate now how Journey (especially the gifted duo of singer Steve Perry and guitarist Neal Schon) were playing with as much passion as rock ’n’ roll in the late '70s would allow.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
101 Ratings

101 Ratings

gambitto ,

Great album

It is a shame that most people only recognize the radio hits from Journey. When you look back on their albums, there are plenty of great tracks that people would be enjoy even more than the hits. Sweet and Simple, Lovin You Is Easy and When You're Alone are just as good as the hits on this album.

Journeyrox666 ,

Journey's greatest

I know you have the classics such as Don't Stop Believin' , Lights, Anyway You Want It etc but if you like great guitar, strong vocals, and just overall rockin' music......THIS ALBUM IS FOR YOU. My dad would listen to journey while i was growing up and i always seemed to have a like for it and now at the age of 16 Journey is my favorite band. i could listen to a journey song for the first time and fall in love with it! JOURNEY IS AMAZING

RAZ)v(aTAZ ,

this review is for the young kids

this Too was my first album, given to me by my brothers girlfriend at the time. The music in this cd is the best of its time. If you play.. or like guitar,bass,drums,or keyboards,or just love a good vocal singer. This cd is for you. After you buy this you will want to go back to the start, and get all the other journey cd's because they really rock..this is late night drivin music at its best. this music is raw and right in your face.

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