22 Songs, 2 Hours 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Vol. 2 features the second night at London's Wembley Empire Pool from The Grateful Dead's fully recorded European 1972 tour. Closing in on three hours, the two sets gave British audiences an excellent lesson in mind and music expansion. “Cumberland Blues” appeared on the classic 1972 live album Europe ’72, with “Looks Like Rain” eventually appended as a bonus track. A number of tracks here appeared on Steppin’ Out with the Grateful Dead: England ’72, including the essential half-hour version of “Dark Star” and “Sugar Magnolia” and what follows. For hardcore fans, the previously unreleased excitement is the remainder of the first set—with the group handling “Bertha,” “Me and My Uncle,” “Tennessee Jed,” “Good Lovin’,” and “Casey Jones” with all the sweat and inspiration you'd expect from the band that practically reinvented the extended jam and took the blues from brutal Chicago clubs and added hippie-era good vibes and sensitivity to everything they touched. There’s a reason The Grateful Dead excelled beyond their peers, and much of it was the refuge from the daily grind and a sense that time and life was your own. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Vol. 2 features the second night at London's Wembley Empire Pool from The Grateful Dead's fully recorded European 1972 tour. Closing in on three hours, the two sets gave British audiences an excellent lesson in mind and music expansion. “Cumberland Blues” appeared on the classic 1972 live album Europe ’72, with “Looks Like Rain” eventually appended as a bonus track. A number of tracks here appeared on Steppin’ Out with the Grateful Dead: England ’72, including the essential half-hour version of “Dark Star” and “Sugar Magnolia” and what follows. For hardcore fans, the previously unreleased excitement is the remainder of the first set—with the group handling “Bertha,” “Me and My Uncle,” “Tennessee Jed,” “Good Lovin’,” and “Casey Jones” with all the sweat and inspiration you'd expect from the band that practically reinvented the extended jam and took the blues from brutal Chicago clubs and added hippie-era good vibes and sensitivity to everything they touched. There’s a reason The Grateful Dead excelled beyond their peers, and much of it was the refuge from the daily grind and a sense that time and life was your own. 

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